West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy

By P. T. Bauer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 25 THE ECONOMICS OF MARKETING REFORM: MEASURES AND PROPOSALS (1)

Apart from the establishment of the marketing boards there have in recent years been other official measures, as well as numerous proposals for others, designed to alter the structure of the marketing of West African produce. This part of the study reviews certain measures and recommendations which stem from influential opinions onmarketing reform in West Africa and elsewhere. Some of the proposals bear on the import trade and internal trade, as well as on the export trade, with reference to which they are usually advanced.


1. PROPOSALS FOR COMPULSORY REDUCTION IN THE NUMBER OF INTERMEDIARIES

In Chapter 2 it has been shown that the very large number of intermediaries in West African trade is to be explained in terms of underlying economic factors. In particular, it reflects the low level of capital and certain other productive resources and a comparative superabundance of unskilled labour in relation to the opportunities open to it. In these conditions the multiplicity of traders (both in the sense of a large number of traders at any given stage of distribution and of a large number of successive stages) is economic in the use of available resources.

These considerations are generally overlooked by the critics of the alleged wastefulness of the system. Compulsory reduction in the number of traders is often proposed in the belief that it will eliminate waste and reduce distributive margins. It is believed or implied that such a course would reduce prices to consumers or raise them to producers, and that some of the resources set free could be turned to more productive employment, notably to the production of more food.

As a general rule the services of an intermediary will be used only if the cost of his services to his customers (i.e. his margin) is less than the value set on them by the customers, whose capital, time and labour he saves. These services include bulking, blending, holding and distributing stocks, breaking bulk, and the establishment of market contacts. The intermediary will become redundant and will be by-passed if he is superfluous or if his charges are excessive.

This general consideration clearly applies in West Africa, where, no doubt as a result of the low level of incomes and of the comparative lack

-347-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.