Human Motor Behavior: An Introduction

By J. A. Scott Kelso | Go to book overview

play an important role in the endeavor to identify important cognitive abilities. It can be used to measure the speed of attentional shifting, the speed to draw on redundant cues that predict what will happen next, the speed of accessing spatial information, and so on. Reaction time should be viewed not as a basic ability in itself but rather as a technique to be used in measuring these other abilities.


REFERENCES

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