Human Motor Behavior: An Introduction

By J. A. Scott Kelso | Go to book overview

Glossary
This glossary is included for the purpose of defining terms that may not be clear in the body of the text. Initials of the authors identify the definitions.
Additive effects: The effects on the dependent variable when independent variables affect different stages of processing such that the total deficit is equal to the sum of each stage's deficit. (GES)
Afference: The conduction of information from peripheral sensory receptors towards the brain via nerve fibres. (GES)
Closed-Loop: A mode of system control in which feedback from action is compared against a reference of correctness to compute an error signal, which serves as a stimulus for future action. (RAS)
Coding: The act of transferring information from one processing stage to another so that the receiving stage optimally comprehends the information. (GES)
Dependent variable: The factor which is observed and measured to determine the effect of the independent variable. It is considered dependent because its value depends upon the value of the independent variable. (GES)
Detection: The result of stimuli impinging upon sensory receptors-sensation; also the first stage of information processing. (GES)
Difficulty: For rapid movements, the ratio of movement amplitude and movement time (A/MT), or the average velocity. (RAS)
Effective target width (We): The variability of a set of aiming responses about their own mean. (RAS)

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