The U. S. College Graduate

By F. Lawrence Babcock | Go to book overview

no serious maldistribution of learning (see pages 17 et seq.). Of corollary significance are the findings as to how far from home base, and to what kind of community, college graduates are inclined to flow after Commencement Day -- and how well those who have changed their locations get along, compared with the stay-at-homes.


Chapter 6
The Alma Mater

In the main, this report deals with the college graduate, and not with the college. It is concerned with the all-important fact that about two per cent of the U. S. population has had a higher education -- not with the particular brand of institution that provided the teaching. The data appended here, however, supplies basis for some limited conclusions as to hat kind of a college is likely to produce what kind of a graduate.

Co-educational colleges: Among both men and women graduates the ratio of those who attended co-educational colleges, as compared with those who went to an institution restricted to their own sex, is about three-to-one -- and this applies in nearly the same measure to graduates over forty years old as it does to those under thirty. In other words, it has been true for two decades, or more, that about 75 per cent of the men and 75 per cent of the women graduating each year have come from colleges and universities that receive students of both sexes. The only likely difference between the co-educated majority and the minority who have been more or less sequestered during the usual four years of the educational process might be supposed to be found in their sex lives, as reflected by marital status. But the figures show only these small variations:


TABLE Z
Marital Status of Co-educational and Non Co-educational College Graduates
Graduates of Colleges that are --
Co-educationalNon Co-educational
Percentage of men married70.1%61.4%
Percentage of married men divorced or separated1.41.7
Percentage of women married45.945.0
Percentage of married women divorced or separated3.53.7

-38-

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