Oceana: Or, England and Her Colonies

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.

Landing at Melbourne--First impression of the city--Sir Henry Loch --Government House--Party assembled there--Agitation about New Guinea--The Monroe doctrine in the Pacific--Melbourne Gardens-- Victorian Society--The Premier--Federation, local and imperial-- The Astronomer Royal--The Observatory--English. Institutions reproduced--Proposed tour in the Colony--Melbourne amusements-- Music--The Theatre--Sunday at Melbourne--Night at the Observatory.

WE landed at our leisure at Williamstown, from which a railway train was to take us to the city. We were in no hurry, for the day was still early, and we had no plans, save to find an hotel in the course of it. A 'nigger,' who must have weighed thirty stone, wheeled our luggage to the station in a hand cart. As at Adelaide, I was impressed by the good English and good manners of the station officials. There was an American smartness about them, but it was American with a difference. Something might be due to the climate. Manners soften of themselves where tempers are never ruffled by cold. The line makes a long circuit by the shore; we had ten miles to go. The fields were enclosed all the way with the Australian rails one hears riding men talk about--heavy timbers four feet and a half or five feet high. Clusters of wooden houses were sprinkled about, growing thicker as we advanced, and painted white to keep off the sun. Gardens and flowers were, as usual, universal. Melbourne station was, like other metropolitan stations in the world, vast, crowded, and unbeautiful. Again some ingenuity was needed to escape the newspaper people; we extricated ourselves only at last by a promise

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oceana: Or, England and Her Colonies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 396

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.