Oceana: Or, England and Her Colonies

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.

Visit to Moss Vale-- LordAugustus Loftus--Position of a Governor in New South Wales--LadyAugustus--Chinese servants--English newspapers--Dinner-party conversations--A brave and true bishop --Sydney harbour once more--Conversation with Mr. Dalley on Imperial Federation--Objections to proposed schemes--The Navy-- The English flag.

LATE hours, fine cooking, and agreeable society are very pleasant, but less wholesome than one could wish them to be. The town became insufferably hot. My mosquito-bites refused to heal, and some change was desirable. The Governor, who had already asked me to visit him in his highland quarters, graciously renewed his invitation. His aide-decamp assured me that it was meant in earnest, and that Lord Augustus Loftus would be disappointed if we left the country without seeing him, so we agreed to go.

Moss Vale, the summer residence of the Governor of New South Wales, is a hundred miles from Sydney. Why it is called Vale I do not know, for it stands on the brow of an eminence two thousand feet above the sea. It corresponds to Mount Macedon in Victoria, save that, instead of being in the midst of forests, it is surrounded with rolling grassy uplands, thickly sprinkled with trees, sheep, and cattle-farms, &c., and long ago taken up and appropriated. The house has been lately purchased by the colony for the Governor's use. It is small, considering the dignity of its destination, and is unfinished within and without. Like all other coun

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Oceana: Or, England and Her Colonies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 18
  • Chapter III 37
  • Chapter IV 61
  • Chapter V 72
  • Chapter VI 82
  • Chapter VII 94
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 134
  • Chapter X 150
  • Chapter XI 161
  • Chapter XII 198
  • Chapter XIII 214
  • Chapter XIV 230
  • Chapter XV 255
  • Chapter XVI 278
  • Chapter XVII 294
  • Chapter XVIII 305
  • Chapter XIX 336
  • Chapter XX 354
  • Chapter XXI 383
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