New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910

By Don H. Doyle | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has incurred many debts to people and institutions who have helped along the way. The Vanderbilt University Research Council played an instrumental role from the beginning, when it provided research and travel expenses, to the end, when it granted me a University Fellowship to help support a year's leave to write the book and then came through with vital funds for the illustrations. Thanks especially to deans Ernest Campbell and Russell Hamilton, who presided over the Research Council when I received support. The American Philosophical Society provided a small grant for research expenses early in the project. The American Council of Learned Societies gave me a grant-in-aid to defray travel expenses and, later, a research fellowship that supported a year on leave to do research. I spent the academic year 1982-83 as a fellow of the Charles Warren Center for the Study of American History at Harvard University, and I am grateful to Steve Thernstrom, Pat Denault, and all my colleagues there for making that year pleasant and productive. The most precious resource any historian requires is time; for allowing me generous amounts of it during three research leaves, I owe special thanks to Dean Jacque Voegeli of the College of Arts and Science at Vanderbilt.

Over the course of many years and many miles of travel while working on this book, I have appreciated the aid of a multitude of librarians, archivists, and local history experts. In Nashville, Mary Glenn Hearne and her able staff at the Nashville Room of the Ben West Public Library were indispensable. The friendly people at the Tennessee State Library and Archives were always helpful and cooperative. The Atlanta Historical Society provided a pleasant place to work during several visits; thanks especially to Eugene Craig, who helped me on my initial visit and showed me Atlanta from downtown to black side. No book dealing with Atlanta could be completed without drawing upon the remarkable knowledge of Franklin Garrett of the Atlanta Historical Society,

-xvii-

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New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - The Urbanization Of Dixie 1
  • 2 - The New Order of Things 22
  • 3 - Ebb Tide 51
  • 4 - New Men 87
  • 5 - Patrician and Parvenu 111
  • 6 - Atlanta Spirit 136
  • 7 - The Charleston Style 159
  • 8 - New Class 189
  • 9 - Gentility and Mirth 226
  • 10 - The New Paternalism 260
  • 11 - Paternalism and Pessimism 290
  • Epilogue 313
  • Notes 319
  • Index 363
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