New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910

By Don H. Doyle | Go to book overview

Notes

Abbreviations
ADAHAlabama Department of Archives and History, Montgomery, Ala.
AHSAtlanta Historical Society, Atlanta, Ga.
BLBaker Library, Harvard School of Business, Cambridge, Mass.
CLSCharleston Library Society, Charleston, S.C.
GDAHGeorgia Department of Archives and History, Atlanta, Ga.
MCMMuseum of the City of Mobile, Mobile, Ala.
MPLMobile Public Library, Mobile, Ala.
SCASouth Carolina Archives, Columbia, S.C.
SCHSSouth Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, S.C.
SCLSouth Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.
SHCSouthern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C.
TSLATennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tenn.

Preface
1. Atlanta Constitution, Aug. 15, 1880; Richmond Whig and Advertiser, Apr. 4, 1876; Mark Twain, Life on the Mississippi ( Boston, 1883), 412; the latter two sources are quoted in C. Vann Woodward, Origins of the New South, 1877- 1913 ( Baton Rouge, La., 1950), 151-52.
2. Woodward, Origins, 150-51, 179, 140-41,
3. C. Vann Woodward, Thinking Back: The Perils of Writing History ( Baton Rouge, La., 1986), 62-63; Wilbur J. Cash, The Mind of the South ( New York, 1941). For early interpretations of southern continuity, see also Broadus Mitchell and George S. Mitchell, The Industrial Revolution in the South ( Baltimore, Md., 1930); U. B. Phillips, "The Central Theme of Southern History", American Historical Review 34 ( Oct. 1928): 30-43.
4. See, for example, Henry Woodfin Grady, The New South, edited by Oliver Dyer ( New York, 1890); Phillip Alexander Bruce, The Rise of the New South ( Philadelphia, 1905); Holland Thompson, The New South (New Haven, Conn., 1929). See also Paul M. Gaston, The New South Creed: A Study in Southern Mythmaking ( Baton Rouge, La., 1970), for an overview of New South thought and rhetoric.
5. The most explicit interpretations of the planters as opponents of bourgeois values, free labor,

-319-

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New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - The Urbanization Of Dixie 1
  • 2 - The New Order of Things 22
  • 3 - Ebb Tide 51
  • 4 - New Men 87
  • 5 - Patrician and Parvenu 111
  • 6 - Atlanta Spirit 136
  • 7 - The Charleston Style 159
  • 8 - New Class 189
  • 9 - Gentility and Mirth 226
  • 10 - The New Paternalism 260
  • 11 - Paternalism and Pessimism 290
  • Epilogue 313
  • Notes 319
  • Index 363
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