The Antitrust Laws of the United States of America: A Study of Competition Enforced by Law

By A. D. Neale | Go to book overview

PREFACE

I believe there is room on this side of the Atlantic for a book about the antitrust laws of the United States. Increased activity by United Kingdom business in the United States market and increased contacts with American firms have drawn more British companies into uncomfortable proximity with antitrust litigation, and the beginnings of a corpus of case-law under the Restrictive Trade Practices Act of 1956 may make it useful and interesting to have available the means for comparing the United Kingdom decisions, as they appear, with the established lines of antitrust doctrine.

The opportunity to enlarge on an initial interest in this topic came to me as a result of the privilege of being awarded a Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in 1952, and I must record my debt to the officers of the Fund for their help in facilitating my programme of study in the United States and for many personal kindnesses.

While I was in Washington I was kindly given working-space in the Federal Trade Commission and received every assistance from the Commission's Librarian. I was greatly helped and encouraged by the friendly interest and willingness to discuss their work of officials both in the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice, who are too numerous to be acknowledged individually. I must, however, record my special indebtedness to Professor Corwin D. Edwards, at that time head of the Bureau of Industrial Economics in the Commission, who guided me at the outset and has subsequently read substantial parts of the manuscript and made many illuminating comments and corrections; and to Mr Sigmund Timberg, formerly a Special Assistant to the Attorney General in the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice, who has, with the greatest kindness and tolerance, read nearly all the draft and suggested many improvements. I must also thank Mr George E. Frost of Chicago, who kindly read and gave me good advice about the chapter on the patent cases. For whatever errors and misjudgments remain, I am, of course, solely responsible.

The writing of the book would not have been possible without the generous help of my employers, the Board of Trade, in allowing me to be seconded to the National Institute of Economic and Social Research for a period sufficient to enable the bulk of the drafting to be done. This in turn was made possible by a grant received from the Government under the Conditional Aid Scheme for the use of counterpart

-xv-

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