When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846

By Ramón A. Gutiérrez | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book could not have been written without the help, encouragement, and love of many individuals and institutions. Arthur and Nellie Gutiérrez, my parents, made it all possible, lifting my spirits and sustaining my life. My special thanks to them, and also to my history godfather, Alan Gerlach, who as my first teacher of Latin American history was the person most responsible for leading me into the profession.

The embryo of this book grew out of a course of doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin in Madison under the direction of Peter H. Smith, Thomas E. Skidmore, Thomas J. McCormick, and Steve J. Stern. Over the years these men have been inspiring mentors, demanding critics, loyal counselors, and treasured friends. I find it difficult to express adequately my gratitude to Peter H. Smith. Had he not encouraged me continually, when it all seemed impossible, had he not been convinced that Chicano history was a legitimate field of historical research, when many others had theidoubts, and had he not urged me to explore the history of kinship and sexuality to understand the dynamics of race and class, this book never would have been produced.

I owe a billion thanks to William B. Taylor for carefully reading and rereading my manuscript and every last footnote. With an immense knowledge of Latin American history and cultural anthropology, he offered me generous, gentle, and constructive criticisms. Along with his advice, bibliographic leads, and leading questions, he has honored me with his friendship, sustained me with his humaneness, and inspired me with his own scholarship.

Several friends and colleagues read various incarnations of this work, in part or whole, helped me polish its argument, and offered their unending encouragement. For all of this I thank Tomás Almaguer, George Reid

-vii-

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When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Tables and Figures xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Part I - The Sixteenth Century. 1
  • I - The Pueblo Indian World in the Sixteenth Century 3
  • Part II - The Seventeenth Century 37
  • 2 - The Spanish Conquest of New Mexico 39
  • 3 - Seventeenth-Century Politics 95
  • Part III - The Eighteenth Century 141
  • 4 - The Reconquest of New Mexico 143
  • 5 - Honor and Social Status 176
  • 6 - Honor and Virtue 207
  • 7 - Honor and Marriage 227
  • 8 - Marriage and the Church 241
  • 9 - Marriage -- the Empirical Evidence 271
  • 10 - The Bourbon Reforms on the Northern Frontier 298
  • Epilogue 337
  • Reference Matter 341
  • Notes 343
  • Bibliography 389
  • Index 417
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