When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846

By Ramón A. Gutiérrez | Go to book overview

8
Marriage and the Church

Several models of marriage existed side by side in colonial New Mexico. Whether one was a priest, a marital candidate, or the parents of the bride and the groom largely dictated which model would be considered sacred and which profane. For the Catholic Church marriage was a sacrament instituted by Christ. How this sacramental theory squared with familial collectivist notions of marriage as the seal to a social alliance between two kinship groups is our concern in this chapter. But before examining the conflicts that these contradictory models of marriage provoked between clergy and laity, let us begin with a discussion of the Church's concept of dualism, which was so central to these debates.

Catholic theologians defined the human as constituted of body and soul. To engender a child, a man and woman united in intercourse, sharing physical substance, semen and an ovum. Once that child was conceived and born into the world, its rebirth into Christ and the life of the spirit was accomplished through baptism. As we saw in our discussion of Pueblo Indian baptisms in the seventeenth century, and again when we discussed slave baptisms and the selection of their baptismal godparents, the friars believed that baptism as an act of spiritual regeneration rivaled, and indeed surpassed, in importance physical generation. When a priest christened a child, said St. Thomas Aquinas in the Summa Theologica, that child was "born again a son of God as Father, and of the Church as Mother." The priest who lifted the child at the baptismal font stood in the place of God, Aquinas asserted. Fray Junípero Serra clearly understood the implication of this fact for kinship politics, stating of Indian neophytes: "Sir, they are our children, for none except us have engendered them in Christ. The result is we look upon them as a father looks upon his family. We shower all our love and care upon them." 1

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Tables and Figures xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Part I - The Sixteenth Century. 1
  • I - The Pueblo Indian World in the Sixteenth Century 3
  • Part II - The Seventeenth Century 37
  • 2 - The Spanish Conquest of New Mexico 39
  • 3 - Seventeenth-Century Politics 95
  • Part III - The Eighteenth Century 141
  • 4 - The Reconquest of New Mexico 143
  • 5 - Honor and Social Status 176
  • 6 - Honor and Virtue 207
  • 7 - Honor and Marriage 227
  • 8 - Marriage and the Church 241
  • 9 - Marriage -- the Empirical Evidence 271
  • 10 - The Bourbon Reforms on the Northern Frontier 298
  • Epilogue 337
  • Reference Matter 341
  • Notes 343
  • Bibliography 389
  • Index 417
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.