When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846

By Ramón A. Gutiérrez | Go to book overview

10
The Bourbon Reforms on the Northern Frontier

The eighteenth century in New Mexico was ushered in by the beat of war drums; drums that beat continually for the rest of the century. The century had been ushered in by the reconquest, but as the Pueblo Indians admitted their defeat and openly submitted to Spanish authority, New Mexico's españoles shifted their attention to the indios bárbaros, the nomadic Indians. Mounted, armed, and masters now of equestrian hitand-run tactics, these nomads submerged the province in endless war. The Spaniards defended themselves as best they could and always avenged their losses. New Mexicans said that they simply were chastising Indian obstinacy. But the number of Apache and Comanche prisoners pressed into slavery gave this justification a hollow ring.

New Mexico's defense became an acute preoccupation for the Spanish crown in the eighteenth century primarily because the silver-producing provinces of northern New Spain were at risk. By the middle of the eighteenth century two-thirds of the world's silver was being extracted from the northern Mexican provinces of Nueva Galicia, Nueva Vizcaya, and Nuevo León, and that extraction was keeping Spain solvent. So some solution to the marauding Indians who inhibited orderly trade and communication between the northern provinces had to be found. Equally troubling, though undoubtedly less vexing, was the increasing penetration of its American empire by foreigners, particularly in northern Mexico, at the margins of its most valuable terrain. Spain's xenophobia was noticeably increased in 1763, when, at the end of the French and Indian War ( 1754-63), Spain acquired from France the trans-Mississippi West and the English took everything east of the river. Spain and England were now face-to-face in North America. Already the French had armed the Comanches and driven them south from Illinois into Apache hunting

-298-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
When Jesus Came, the Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.