CHAPTER VII
LE DIALOGUE DU FOU ET DU SAGE AND WITTY AND WITLESS

TEXTS. I cite from Monmerqué's reprint of the French dialogue, with marginal readings from the British Museum edition (see Appendix B). Trifling variants are not noted. I cite from the Percy Society print of Witty and Witless.

HEYWOOD'S Witty and Witless (OR Wit and folly) IS preserved in manuscript in the British Museum (Harl. Ms., 367) and is not known to have been printed before the nineteenth century. The reference to Henry's fool, Will Somers, and the direction that three of the closing stanzas 'in the Kyngs absens, ar voyde' indicate the quality of its audience but do not help to fix its date within reasonable limits. It is tempting to regard it as a juvenile bid for fame. At any rate, the fact that it lacks the elaboration and stage business of Love permits us to suppose it an earlier piece of work. I understand that K. W. Cameron, in The Background of John Heywood's 'Witty and Witless' ( Raleigh, North Carolina; The Thistle Press, 1941), proposes a date of composition c. 1522. A few years one way or the other would not, however, affect the present question.

Le fou et le sage has been tentatively assigned to the reign of Louis XII (died 1 January 1515). It may well have been written before 1515, but the only conclusions for which I can find some definite evidence are that it was printed at Lyons between 1516 and 1527, and at Paris before 1532. The number and variety of the old editions show that it was long popular. These matters are discussed in Appendix B.

It may be noted that neither of the texts from which I cite is to be relied on in detail. The Percy Society print of Witty and Witless, like Farmer's modernized text of this and other plays, has several misreadings. Professor De la Bère's more recent text is also faulty. For the present purpose, however, one need not refer the reader to the

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
French Farce & John Heywood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.