The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Awake! (not Greece -- she is awake!)
Awake, my spirit! Think through whom
Thy life-blood tracks its parent lake,
And then strike home!

Tread those reviving passions down,

Unworthy manhood! -- unto thee 30
Indifferent should the smile or frown
Of beauty be.

If thou regret'st thy youth, why live?
The land of honourable death
Is here: -- up to the field, and give
Away thy breath!

Seek out -- less often sought than found-
A soldier's grave, for thee the best;
Then look around, and choose thy ground,

And take thy rest. 40

MISSOLONGHI, January 22,1824.


DOMESTIC PIECES

[It is not necessary to say that these poems are concerned with the separation between Lord Byron and his wife. They are so distinct in character that it has seemed best to separate them from among the other Miscellaneous Poems.]


FARE THEE WELL

[ Moore relates on the authority of by ron' Memoranda that these stanzas were written 'under the swell of tender recollections' as the poet 'sat one night musing in the study. . . the tears falling fast over the paper as he wrote them.' Mr. Coleridge avers that there are no tear-marks on the original draft of the poem. 'T is pity.]

'Alas! they had been friends in Youth; But whispering tongues can poison truth: And constancy lives in realms above; And Life is thorny; and youth is vain; And to be wroth with one we love, Doth work like madness in the brain;

But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining - They stood aloof, the scars rem, Like cliffs, which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between, But neither beat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.' COLERIDGE'S Christabel.

FARE thee well! and if for ever, Still for ever, fare thee well:
Even though unforgiving, never 'Gainst thee shall my heart rebel.

Would that breast were bared before thee Where thy head so oft hath lain,
While that placid sleep came o'er thee Which thou ne'er canst know again:

Would that breast, by thee glanced over,

Every inmost thought could show! 10
Then thou wouldst at last discover
'T was not well to spurn it so.

Though the world for this commend thee -- Though it smile upon the blow,
Even its praises must offend thee, Founded on another's woe:

Though my many faults defaced me,
Could no other arm be found,
Than the one which once embraced me,

To inflict a cureless wound?20

Yet, oh yet, thyself deceive not; Love may sink by slow decay,
But by sudden wrench, believe not Hearts can thus be torn away:

Still thine own its life retaineth -- Still must mine, though bleeding, beat;
And the undying thought which paineth Is -- that we no more may meet.

These are words of deeper sorrow

Than the wail above the dead; 30
Both shall live, but every morrow
Wake us from a widow'd bed.

And when thou wouldst solace gather, When our child's first accents flow,
Wilt thou teach her to say 'Father!' Though his care she must forego?

When her little hands shall press thee,
When her lip to thine is press'd,
Think of him whose prayer shall bless thee,

Think of him thy love had biess'd! 40

-207-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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