The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Like foam from the roused ocean of deep
Hell,
Whose every wave breaks on a living shore
Heap'd with the damn'd like pebbles. -- I

am giddy. 350

C. Hun. I must approach him cautiously; if near,
A sudden step will startle him, and he Seems tottering already.

Man. Mountains have fallen,
Leaving a gap in the clouds, and with the shock
Rocking their Alpine brethren; filling up
The ripe green valleys with destruction's splinters;
Damming the rivers with a sudden dash,
Which crush'd the waters into mist and made
Their fountains find another channel -- thus
Thus, in its old age, did Mount Rosen

berg -- 360
Why stood I not beneath it?

C. Hun. Friend! have a care, Your next step may be fatal! -- for the love
Of him who made you, stand not on that brink!

Man. (not hearing him). Such would have been for me a fitting tomb;
My bones had then been quiet in their depth;
They had not then been strewn upon the rocks
For the wind's pastime -- as thus -- thus they shall be --
In this one plunge. -- Farewell, ye opening heavens!
Look not upon me thus reproachfully --
Ye were not meant for me -- Earth! take

these atoms! 370

[As MANFRED is in act to spring front the cliff, the CHAmois HUNTER seizes and retains him with a sudden grasp.

C. Hun. Hold, madman! -- though aweary of thy life,
Stain not our pure vales with thy guilty blood!
Away with me -- I will not quit my hold.

Man. I am most sick at heart -- nay, grasp me not --
I am all feebleness -- the mountains whirl Spinning around me -- I grow blind -- What art thou?

C. Hun. I'll answer that anon. -- Away with me!
The clouds grow thicker -- there -- now lean on me --
Place your foot here -- here, take this staff, and cling
A moment to that shrub -- now give me

your hand, 380
And hold fast by my girdle -- softly -- well --
The Chalet will be gain'd within an hour.
Come on, we'll quickly find a surer footing,
And something like a pathway, which the torrent
Hath wash'd since winter. -- Come, 't is bravely done;
You should have been a hunter. -- Follow me.

[As they descend the rocks with difficulty, the scene closes.


ACT II

SCENE I

A Cottage amongst the Bernese Alps.

MANFRED and the CHAMOIS HUNTER.

C. Hun. No, no, yet pause, thou must not yet go forth:
Thy mind and body are alike unfit To trust each other, for some hours, at least; When thou art better, I will be thy guide -- But whither?

Man. It imports not; I do know My route full well and need no further guidance.

C. Hun. Thy garb and gait bespeak thee of high lineage --
One of the many chiefs, whose castled crags
Look o'er the lower valleys -- which of these
May call thee lord? I only know their pot

tals; 10
My way of life leads me but rarely down
To bask by the huge hearths of those old halls,
Carousing with the vassals; but the paths,
Which step from out our mountains to their doors,
I know from childhood -- which of these is thine?

Man. No matter.

C. Hun. Well, sir, pardon me the question, And be of better cheer. Come, taste my wine;

-483-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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