The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Wer. You must also furnish me An hour ere daybreak with all means to quit This place.

Iden.| But is it real? Let me look on it: Diamond, by all that's glorious!

Wer. Come, I'll trust you: 310

You have guess'd, no doubt, that I was born above
My present seeming.

Iden. I can't say I did, Though this looks like it: this is the true breeding Of gentle blood!

Wer. I have important reasons For wishing to continue privily My journey hence.

Iden. So then you are the man Whom Stralenheim's in quest of?

Wer. I am not;
But being taken for him might conduct
So much embarrassment to me just now,

And to the baron's self hereafter -- 't is 320
To spare both that I would avoid all bustle.

Iden. Be you the man or no, 't is not my business; Besides, I never should obtain the half From this proud, niggardly noble, who would raise The country for some missing bits of coin, And never offer a precise reward -- But this! -- another look!

Wer. Gaze on it freely; At day-dawn it is yours.

Iden. Oh, thou sweet sparkler!
Thou more than stone of the philosopher!

Thou touchstone of Philosophy herself! 330
Thou bright eye of the Mine! thou load-star of
The soul! the true magnetic Pole to which
All hearts point duly north, like trembling needles!
Thou flaming Spirit of the Earth! which, sitting
High on the monarch's diadem, attractest
More worship than the majesty who sweats
Beneath the crown which makes his head ache, like
Millions of hearts which bleed to lend it lustre!
Shalt thou be mine? I am, methinks, al-ready
A little king, a lucky alchymist! 340
A wise magician, who has bound the devil
Without the forfeit of his soul. But come,
Werner, or what else?

Wer. Call me Werner still; You may yet know me by a loftier title.

Iden. I do believe in thee! thou art the spirit
Of whom I long have dream'd in a low garb --
But come, I'll serve thee; thou shalt be as free
As air, despite the waters; let us hence:
I'll show thee I am honest (oh, thou jewel!) --

Thou shalt be furnishd, Werner, with such means 350

Of flight, that if thou wert a snail, not birds
Should overtake thee. -- Let me gaze again!
I have a foster-brother in the mart
Of Hamburgh skill'd in precious stones.
How many
Carats may it weigh? -- Come, Werner, I will wing thee. [Exeunt.


SCENE II

STRALENHEIM'S Chamber. STRALENHEIM and FRITZ.

Fritz. All's ready, my good lord!

Stral. I am not sleepy, And yet I must to bed; I fain would say To rest, but something heavy on my spirit, Too dull for wakefulness, too quick for slumber, Sits on me as a cloud along the sky, 360 Which will not let the sunbeams through, nor yet Descend in rain and end, but spreads itself 'Twixt earth and heaven, like envy between man And man, an everlasting mist; -- I will Unto my pillow.

Fritz. May you rest there well!

Stral. I feel, and fear I shall.

Fritz. And wherefore fear?

Stral. I know not why, and therefore do fear more,
Because an undescribable -- but 't is
All folly. Were the locks (as I desired)

Changed, to-day, of this chamber? for last night's 370

Adventure makes it needful.

Fritz. Certainly, According to your order, and beneath The inspection of myself and the young Saxon Who saved your life. I think they call him 'Ulric.'

-700-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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