The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron

By George Gordon Byron | Go to book overview

Ashes are feeble foes : it is more easy
To baffle such, than countermine a mole
Which winds its blind but living path be- neath you.

Yet hear me still ! -- if you condemn me, yet
Remember who hath taught me once too

often 440
To listen to him! Who proclaim'd to me
That there were crimes made venial by the occasion?
That passion was our nature? that the goods
Of Heaven waited on the goods of for-tune?
Who show'd me his humanity secured
By his nerves only? Who deprived me of
All power to vindicate myself and race
In open day, by his disgrace which stamp'd
(It might be) bastardy on me, and on
Himself -- a felon's brand? The man who
is 450
At once both warm and weak invites to deeds
He longs to do, but dare not. Is it strange
That I should act what you could think?
We have done
With right and wrong; and now must only ponder
Upon effects, not causes. Stralenheim,
Whose life I saved from impulse, as, un-known,
I would have saved a peasant's or a dog's,
I slew
Known as our foe -- but not from ven-geance. He
Was a rock in our way which I cut through,
As doth the bolt, because it stood between
us 460
And our true destination -- but not idly.

As stranger I preserved him, and he owed me
His life : when due, I but resumed the debt.

He, you, and I stood o'er a gulf wherein
I have plunged our enemy. You kindled first
The torch, you show'd the path; now trace me that
Of safety, or let me!
Sieg. I have done with life!
Ulr. Let us have done with that which cankers life,
Familiar feuds and vain recriminations
Of things which cannot be undone. We

have 470
No more to learn or hide : I know no fear,
And have within these very walls men who
(Although you know them not) dare venture all things.

You stand high with the state; what passes here
Will not excite her too great curiosity:
Keep your own secret, keep a steady eye,
Stir not, and speak not; -- leave the rest to me:
We must have no third babblers thrust between us. [EXit ULRIC.

Seig (solus). Am I awake? are these my father's halls?
And you -- my son? My son ! mine ! who

have ever 480
Abhorr'd both mystery and blood, and yet
Am plunged into the deepest hell of both!
I must be speedy, or more will be shed -
The Hungarian's ! -- Ulric -- he hath par-tisans,
It seems : I might have guess'd as much.
Oh fool!
Wolves prowl in company. He hath the key
(As I too) of the opposite door which leads
Into the turret. Now then ! or once more
To be the father of fresh crimes, no less
Than of the criminal! Ho ! Gabor! Gabor ! 490

[Exit into the turret, closing the door after him.


SCENE II

The Interior of the Turret.

GABOR and SIZGENDORF.

Gab. Who calls? Sieg. I -- Siegendorf ! Take these, and fly!
Lose not a moment !
[Tears off a diamond star and other jewels, and thrusts them into GABOR'S hand.

Gab. What am I to do
With these?
Sieg. Whate'er you will: sell them, or hoard,
And prosper; but delay not, or you are lost!

Gab. You pledged your honour for my safety !

Sieg. And
Must thus redeem it. Fly! I am not mas-ter,
It seems, of my own castle -- of my own
Retainers -- nay, even of these very walls,

-720-

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The Complete Poetical Works of Lord Byron
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Editor's Note v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Biographical Sketch xi
  • Childe Harold's Pilgrimage - A Romaunt 1
  • Shorter Poems 83
  • Miscellaneous Poems 139
  • Domestic Pieces 207
  • Hebrew Melodies 216
  • Ephemeral Verses 223
  • Satires 240
  • Tales, Chiefly Oriental 309
  • Italian Poems 436
  • Dramas 477
  • Scene II 481
  • Act II 483
  • Scene I 483
  • Scene II 487
  • Scene IV 488
  • Act III 491
  • Scene I 491
  • Scene II 493
  • Scene III 494
  • Scene IV 495
  • Act I 499
  • Act I 499
  • Scene II 500
  • Act II 509
  • Scene I 509
  • Scene II 516
  • Act III 518
  • Scene I 518
  • Scene II 520
  • Act IV 528
  • Scene I 528
  • Scene II 533
  • Act V 538
  • Act V 538
  • Scene II 546
  • Scenf III 548
  • Scene II 549
  • Sardanapalus 550
  • Scene II 551
  • Act II 561
  • Scene I 561
  • Act III 571
  • Scene I 571
  • Act IV 578
  • Scene I 578
  • Act V 587
  • Scene I 587
  • Act I 595
  • Scene I 595
  • Act II 601
  • Scene I 601
  • Act III 608
  • Scene I 608
  • Act IV 615
  • Scene I 620
  • Scene I 620
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Dramatis Person Æ 627
  • Act II 636
  • Scene I 636
  • Scene II 639
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Heaven and Earth 655
  • Scene II 657
  • Scene II 658
  • Werner; Or, the Inheritance 671
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 683
  • Scene II 688
  • Act III 695
  • Scene I 695
  • Scene II 700
  • Scene III 701
  • Scene IV 701
  • Act IV 704
  • Scene I 704
  • Act V 713
  • Scene II 720
  • The Deformed Transformed 722
  • Scene II 723
  • Scene II 730
  • Part II 735
  • Scene I 735
  • Scene II 737
  • Scene III 738
  • Part III 742
  • Scene I 742
  • Don Juan 744
  • Notes 999
  • Indexes 1045
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