The Sculptor Speaks: Jacob Epstein to Arnold L. Haskell, a Series of Conversations on Art

By Jacob Epstein; Arnold L Haskell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
CHARACTERISTICS OF GREAT ART -- TRADITION -
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE APPRECIATION OF ART

(SUNDAY. It is boiling hot and few people have arrived. We are in the studio, one of the few cool shots in London to-day. Epstein shows me his unfinished study of Lydia, a Lydia with short hair this time. "I have just been going over the MS of our conversations. I find that we have not theorised over-much or laid down too many hard-and-fast rules. When one is writing, just a few are apt to creep in here and there. I am glad. I was only thinking when my model posed for me yesterday how free from all artistic theories I felt. I had no pre-conceived idea. I was just interested in the model and studied her. The method of treatment came easily out of my study. That is the right method. Artists have no time for theory."

I have seen him working at the vast Sun-God, goggled to protect his eyes from the flying chips.

"I work fast but I like to work a long time. Some things I will put away for a year or more and come back to them. The Sun God which you have

-134-

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