Ecclesiastical Records, State of New York - Vol. 2

By James B. Lyon | Go to book overview

ADMINISTRATION OF GOVERNOR SLOUGHTER MARCH 19, 1691-JULY 23, 1691.
THE TEST ACT. 1691.

Although the Test Act was enacted in 1673, it was not introduced into New York until 1691, with Governor Sloughter. It is as follows:

I, A. B...... do solemnly and sincerely in the presence of God, profess, testifie and declare, that I do believe that in the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper there is not any transubstantiation of the elements of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ, at or after the consecration thereof by any person whatsoever; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary or any other saint, and the sacrifice of the Mass, as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous. And I do solemnly in the presence of God, profess, testifie and declare, that I do make this declaration and every part thereof in the plain and ordinary sense of the words read unto me, as they are commonly understood by English Protestants, without any evasion or mental reservation whatsoever, and without any dispensation already granted me for this purpose by the Pope or any person whatsoever, or without any hope of such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever; or without thinking I am or can be acquitted before God or man, or absolved of this declaration, or any part thereof, although the Pope or any other person or persons or power whatsoever should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.

Note. Origin of the Test Act, March 29, 1673, and the causes of its introduction in New York, in 1691.

On account of the Roman tendencies of Charles II., Parliament attached the Test Act to a certain supply bill, and the King was

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