Richard Crashaw: A Study in Baroque Sensibility

By Austin Warren | Go to book overview

PREFACE

WHAT IS the meaning of a poem? Assuredly no age has developed such scrupulosity concerning the reply as ours. Like other questions unasked by common sense but, if raised, innocently answered, this question has produced, among contemporary critics, difficulty amounting to scepticism. The solipsist answer, "As many meanings as there are readers," is the simplest and is, as a description of normal experience, the most accurate; but that is simply to reduce the poem to an "event" and its meaning to the natural associations it arouses in the consciousness and subconsciousness of the reader; it is, in effect, to reduce the poem to its subject, or supposed subject (e.g., God, trees, the death of a beautiful woman), upon which, started off by a few rhythmic chords from the poet's lyre, the reader allows himself an agreeable reverie. Yet whatever else it may offer, the special virtue of poetry must be attached to words, its medium, so that if one gains from the reading of a poem no more than that incitation to ruminate provided by a photograph or a tune, one is -- to say the least -- failing to make efficient use of the special art. The fundamental value or "absolute"

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard Crashaw: A Study in Baroque Sensibility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Chapter One - The Laudian Movement and the Counter-Reformation 3
  • Chapter Two - The Man 18
  • Chapter Three - Interlude: Baroque Art and the Emblem 63
  • Chapter Four - The Poetry 77
  • Chapter Five - The Reputation 194
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 241
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.