Vice President in Charge of Revolution

By Murray D. Lincoln; David Karp | Go to book overview

Part One

CHAPTER 1

I WAS BORN in Raynham, Massachusetts, on April 18, 1892. I was the second son in a family that ultimately numbered five boys and one girl.

All of us were born on a stony little New England farm. The focus of our early lives was the small country store that Grandfather Lincoln owned and where my father worked. In those days, the crossroads grocery store served as a meeting place, council hall, and general community center. It had no fixed closing hour. It closed when the last person had nothing more to say but "good night."

The firmest facts about Raynham., just as hard and unrelenting as the rocks which filled its ground, were that it was Protestant, Republican, and insular. The differences between Republicans and Democrats have become so softened over the years it's hard to remember that in Massachusetts in the 1890s it was almost considered sinful to be a Democrat. In Raynham it was assumed that the Democratic party was composed solely of immigrant Irish and Italian Catholics who had been brought into Boston and Fall River, and no self-respecting rural white Protestant would have anything to do with it. New England Yankees of that period were a hard-nosed lot of Protestants. I can still recall the

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Vice President in Charge of Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter 2 18
  • Chapter 3 39
  • Chapter 4 46
  • Part Two 59
  • Chapter 6 81
  • Chapter 7 97
  • Chapter 8 113
  • Part Three 131
  • Chapter 10 148
  • Chapter 11 160
  • Chapter 12 176
  • Part Four 193
  • Chapter 14 204
  • Chapter - 15 217
  • Chapter 16 232
  • Chapter 17 249
  • Part Five 275
  • Chapter 20 304
  • Part Six 316
  • Index 334
  • Acknowledgment 341
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