Social Structure and Mobility in Economic Development

By Neil J. Smelser; Seymour Martin Lipset | Go to book overview

1
SOCIAL STRUCTURE, MOBILITY AND DEVELOPMENT

NEIL J. SMELSER AND SEYMOUR MARTIN LIPSET, * University of California, Berkeley, and Harvard University

ANALYSIS of economic development often begins by identifying a specific dependent variable -- for example, rate of growth of per capita output. The strategy of explanation is to assemble certain independent variables -- consumption, investment, labor supply, for instance -- and, by assigning values to these variables, to arrive at resultant rates of economic growth.1 Sometimes a theory of economic development moves beyond the mere assignment of quantitative values to such independent variables, and takes into account changes in the structure of the economy, such as shifts in the distribution of industries.2

The same strategy of explanation can be followed in analyzing development in non-economic spheres, though frequently it is more difficult to identify variables and specify measures for them. Take educational development, for instance. One salient dependent variable is change in the rate of literacy in a population. The immediate determinants of variations in this rate are the economic and political requirements of the society in question, the availability of teachers and educational facilities,

____________________
*
Although the authors share equal responsibility for this article, we divided the initial drafting by sections that reflect our varying concerns. Smelser handled the first part, dealing with matters of conceptual clarification, while Lipset dealt primarily with the second, the discussion of research problems and findings beginning on page 17. Some of the remarks in the first part grow from a memorandum entitled "The Allocation of Roles in the Process of Development",prepared jointly by Harvey Leibenstein and Smelser. A portion of the second part was published earlier in S. M. Lipset, "Research Problems in the Comparative Analysis of Mobility and Development", International Social Science Journal, 26 ( 1964), pp. 35-48.
1
For a summary of the recent literature on such models, cf. Henry J. Burton, "Contemporary Theorizing on Economic Growth",in Bert F. Hoselitz (ed.), Theories of Economic Growth ( New York: Free Press of Glencoe, 1960), pp. 243-261.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Structure and Mobility in Economic Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.