The Hard Years: A Look at Contemporary America and American Institutions

By Eugene J. McCarthy | Go to book overview

24
Innocence in Politics

Americans generally are suspicious of politics, and this attitude is far from superficial. It goes much deeper than the public dismay over corruption in government or incompetence in public officials. In fact, the American attitude toward politics shows, more clearly than anything else, a belief in the innocence of Americans. It is a belief that has been a significant force since our colonial era.

As inhabitants of a new land, and living under a new government, Americans from the beginning thought of themselves as also new and innocent, set apart from the stream of tradition and unmarked by history. This attitude continued long beyond our status as a young nation.

Politics is considered by many Americans to be an enemy of innocence and simplicity. Party activity, in particular, is considered degrading by citizens who claim to be nonpartisan. So it is common practice in partisan campaigns to organize citizens' and independents' committees, as distinguished from party committees, to support candidates. These devices are supposed to remove the blight of party identification. Another common device is the use of the term "crusade" to identify one's cause.

The Republican campaign of 1952 provided one of the clearest examples of this technique. General Dwight Eisenhower's supporters insisted that their actions and interests were nonpolitical, that their program was based on moral and spiritual principles. Even in their preliminary conflict with the supporters of Senator Robert Taft, Sr., the Eisenhower forces proclaimed the distinction between the crusaders and the politicians clearly and loudly.

In the 1952 battle over convention delegates, the Taft forces viewed the fight over the Texas delegation as a political one. The Eisenhower supporters would not allow the term "political" to be

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Hard Years: A Look at Contemporary America and American Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 229

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.