The Hard Years: A Look at Contemporary America and American Institutions

By Eugene J. McCarthy | Go to book overview

40
Wayne Morse

Wayne Morse ( 1900-1974) began his career as a professor of law. He was elected to the United States Senate from Oregon in 1944 and served in the Senate for twenty-four years. An early opponent of the Vietnam war, Senator Morse was also noted for his work on labor and education legislation.

I write from the experience of some thirty years during which I admired Wayne Morse: ten of those years before I had ever met him, some twenty years of companionship and common work in the Congress of the United States, and twenty years of friendship.

When I first ran for the United States Senate in 1958, I had been in the House of Representatives for ten years and had observed during that time the Senate and the men who were there -- not just where they stood on issues but how they reflected in their judgments what the Senate should be. So when I ran, I asked two senators to come and campaign for me. One was Senator Paul Douglas, and the other was Senator Wayne Morse.

I will not write of Wayne's stand on the issues, for that is well known, but rather of his conception of and his respect for the Senate.

He was, of course, always the Senator from Oregon. But he was at the same time a United States Senator -- truly aware of the function of that body in the operation of this Republic. He knew that the Senate had a strong defensive responsibility: to stand against the House of Representatives, when that was necessary, and to lay down a challenge to the courts. And the second was a point which worried him a great deal. I thought of him in the summer of 1974 as we anticipated the Supreme Court decision on Watergate -- how Wayne Morse, along with great constitutional observers like Alexis de Tocqueville, had said that the ultimate test of democracy in this

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The Hard Years: A Look at Contemporary America and American Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction by Tom Wicker vii
  • Preface xix
  • Part I - Institutions 1
  • 1 - Toward a More Responsible Presidency 3
  • 2 - The Vice President as Crown Prince 15
  • 3 - Changes in the Congress 19
  • 4 - The Courts, the Last Appeal 28
  • 5 - Court of Ideas 32
  • 6 - A Kind Word for the Bureaucrats 35
  • 7 - A Kind Word for the Military 45
  • 8 - A Warning About the Military Establishment 49
  • 9 - The Cia and the Inner Ring 58
  • 10 - The Corporations 61
  • 11 - The Universities 68
  • 12 - The Democratic and Republican Parties 75
  • 13 - Alternatives to the Major Parties 80
  • Part II - Operations 87
  • 14 - A Hard Look at the Primaries 89
  • 15 - Personality Cults 96
  • 16 - The Cult of the Expert 97
  • 17 - A Good and Becoming Exit 100
  • 18 - Listen to Mr. Parkinson 104
  • 19 - The Sst: Object Lesson in Dynamics of Opposition 106
  • 20 - The Lobbyists 109
  • 21 - Grant Park, Chicago 116
  • 22 - Marching on Washington 118
  • 23 - Changing America 122
  • Part III - Principles 125
  • 24 - Innocence in Politics 127
  • 25 - Language and Politics 130
  • 26 - Poetry and War 135
  • 27 - Ares 144
  • 28 - Intellectuals and Politics 148
  • 29 - Out of Phase 155
  • 30 - Trouble in the Economics Community 158
  • 31 - Constitutional Amendments 165
  • 32 - Five Systems of Justice 170
  • 33 - The Enemies List 173
  • 34 - Censorship 182
  • Part IV - A Good Person is Not So Hard to Find 185
  • 35 - John Bennett 187
  • 36 - Emerson Hynes 189
  • 37 - John Kennedy 190
  • 38 - Dan and Doris Kimball 193
  • 39 - Robert Lowell 196
  • 40 - Wayne Morse 197
  • 41 - Lewis Mumford 203
  • 42 - Eleanor Roosevelt 205
  • 43 - Frank Rosenblatt 207
  • 44 - Adlai Stevenson 208
  • Notes 215
  • Index 223
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