The Works of George Herbert

By F. E. Hutchinson; George Herbert | Go to book overview

LETTERS

I. Part of a letter to his Mother.

['this following Letter and Sonnet . . . were in the first year of his going to Cambridge sent his dear Mother for a New-years gift.' Walton Lives ( 1670).]

-- But I fear the heat of my late Ague hath dryed up those

springs, by which Scholars say, the Muses use to take up 5
their habitations. However, I need not their help, to reprove the vanity of those many Love-poems, that are daily writ and consecrated to Venus; nor to bewail that so few are writ, that look towards God and Heaven. For my own part, my meaning (dear Mother) is in these Sonnets, to declare 10 my resolution to be, that my poor Abilities in Poetry, shall be all, and ever consecrated to Gods glory. And -- [New-year, 1609/10]


II. To Sir J/ohn] D[anvers].

SIR, Though I had the best wit in the World, yet it would easily

tyre me, to find out variety of thanks for the diversity of your 15
favours, if I sought to do so; but, I profess it not: And therefore let it be sufficient for me, that the same heart, which you have won long since, is still true to you, and hath nothing else to answer your infinite kindnesses, but a constancy
of obedience; only hereafter I will take heed how I propose 20
my desires unto you, since I find you so willing to yield to my requests; for, since your favours come a Horse-back, there is reason, that my desires should go a-foot; neither do I make any question, but that you have performed your

I. From Walton's Lives ( 1670). Also in Life of Herbert ( 1670). Reprinted in the Life in The Temple ( 1674) and in Lives ( 1675). For the sonnets which accompanied this letter see above, p. 206 12 glory. And --] glory; and I beg you to receive this as one testimony. Added in Lives ( 1675)

II. This and Nos. III, V, VII-X from Walton's Lives, 1670 (here cited as 70) and in Life of Herbert, 1670. Reprinted in Lives, 1675 (75). They were not included in the Life in The Temple, 1674

-363-

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