Negroes and the New Southern Politics

By Donald R. Matthews; James W. Prothro | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Data Collection Procedures

In this book we have drawn on a large volume and a wide variety of data. The methods used in collecting data of this sort have a profound effect on their quality and accuracy. In this appendix, therefore, we shall describe in detail the procedures we followed.


Southwide sample survey of Negro and white opinions

Our most important single source of data was a southwide sample survey of the opinions of Negro and white adults conducted in the spring of 1961.


DEVELOPMENT OF QUESTIONNAIRES

During the early summer of 1960 we prepared two draft questionnaires, one for Negro respondents and another for whites. Later that summer the questionnaires were pretested on about 200 respondents in one urban and one rural community in North Carolina by a trained staff of white and Negro interviewers from the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina. Preliminary analysis of these interviews and consultations with other scholars led us to revise our questionnaires substantially. We had the revised versions pretested in February 1961 in a Florida city by the interviewers from the Survey Research Center of the University of Michigan, who were to conduct the actual survey. The authors and representatives of the Field Section of SRC took part in this pretest. We revised the questionnaires once again on the basis of this experience and in response to advice from the Field Section of SRC.

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