Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War

By John O. Crane; Sylvia E. Crane | Go to book overview

returned for his concluding talk with Roosevelt at noon on June 7th. 45

Beneš expressed satisfaction with his comprehensive review of policies and decisions with Roosevelt and his closest aides, and with congressional and cabinet members too. At the end, Roosevelt expressed pleasure that they had reached a meeting of minds and that he now understood and generally approved the Czechoslovak position, especially vis-à-vis Germanyand the Soviet Union. To mark this understanding publicly, the status of representation between them was raised from that of minister of a legation to the rank of ambassador heading an embassy.

Before departing U.S. shores on June 9, 1943, in an Army Transport Command plane with Smutný and Téborsý, Beneš penned a fond thank-you note to Roosevelt. He wrote: "I found in your government and in the public opinion, the warmest sympathy for the cause of the Czechoslovak people, and I consider it a great privilege to have been able to witness your great war effort. "46 Roosevelt was not to be outdone in graciousness. He wrote with equal warmth in his bon voyage message to Beneš, aptly reflecting lessons learned, in part: "It has been most useful for us to have been able to consult... [as to] the most efficacious means to attain [our] goal... the unconditional defeat of the Axis forces... My best wishes... in your courageous efforts to liberate Czechoslovakia and restore your country and people to freedom and peace."47

Beneš departed from the United States, as he reported in successive cables to Jan Masaryk, with the conviction that, short of an alliance and frontier guarantees, Czechoslovakia would be assisted in its reconstitution by the United States.


NOTES
1.
National Archives, Washington, D.C., 1218, reel 29.
2.
ibid.
3.
Ibid.
4.
Ibid.
5.
Herman Rauschning, The Voice of Destruction ( New York: Putnam, 1940), p. 38; quoted in report dated February 1, 1941, National Archives, 1218, reel 29.
6.
Irving Linnell, Charge d'Affaires, U.S. Embassy in Prague, to Secretary of State, National Archives, 1218, reel 29.
7.
U.S. Legation, Belgrade to Secretary of State, Washington, D.C., March 27, 1940, no. 927, National Archives, 1218, reel 29.

-202-

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Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxvi
  • 1- The Independence Movement Commences 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2- Founding of the Legions: Entrapment in Anti- Bolshevik Intervention 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3- The Legions Anabasis To the Sea 30
  • Notes 46
  • 4- Masaryk in America 50
  • Notes 62
  • 5- Drawing the Frontiers 63
  • Notes 70
  • 6- Internal Stabilization 72
  • Notes 84
  • 7- The Beneš Succession: Storm Warnings (1935-38) 85
  • Notes 101
  • 8- The Sudeten Fires Flare (1938) 103
  • Notes 121
  • 9- Summer Turmoil (1938) 124
  • Notes 130
  • 10- The Runciman Mission (summer 1938) 131
  • Notes 148
  • 11- Munich (september 1938) 151
  • Notes 169
  • 12- Aftermath of Munich (1938-41) 172
  • Notes 185
  • 13- War on Two Fronts (1941) 187
  • Notes 202
  • 14- Wartime Conferences And Treaties 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- The Slovak Uprising: The Government's Return Home 218
  • Notes 232
  • 16- The Government Reconstituted On Home Ground (1945) 235
  • Notes 245
  • 17- Nationalities Transfers And Allied Army Withdrawals (1945) 247
  • Notes 255
  • 18- Democratic Socialization (1945-46) 257
  • Notes 271
  • 19- Cold War Beginnings (1946) 273
  • Notes 287
  • 20- Storm Signals (1947) 290
  • Notes 306
  • 21- The Communist Coup (1947-48) 308
  • Notes 318
  • 22- The Death of Jan Masaryk (1948) 320
  • Notes 332
  • Abbreviations 333
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 343
  • About the Authors 353
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