Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War

By John O. Crane; Sylvia E. Crane | Go to book overview

forces led by Gen. Charles DeGaulle. He believed "that the refusal to recognize the status of liberated France as a Great Power would be as dangerous as the past refusal to recognize the Soviet Union... A strong France was universally needed on the European Continent."35

Beneš took the occasion of being in transit after quitting Moscow to detour to Algiers for a day on January 1st, 1944, and pay a call on General DeGaulle and his Free French Committee. These politicians, despite their meager resources, "put themselves out considerably... to give him an impressive welcome." On their part, they had much to gain in befriending Beneš; they were said to be "also playing strongly for a resumption of the close tie-up with the Czechoslovaks."36 Happily, the British Foreign Office was in full accord as to "the restoration of a strong France and of close ties between France and Czechoslovakia."37

The Free French, however, were still far off in North Africa, while the Red Army was steadily slogging its way westward and destined to approach Prague the soonest. Everyone, whether at home under the Nazi heel or keeping the vigil in London, took heart after the stunning defeat of the Germans at Stalingrad, believing that the Russian armies represented the best hope for liberation of Czechoslovakia.

Beneš left little to chance, or to the magnanimity of the hardfighting Red Army. He did his best in the treaty of alliance to ascertain that his people would not trade another army of occupation for the brutish one on the threshold of eviction. He obtained assurances in advance from the potential liberators that the Czechoslovak provinces would be administered by locally designated units. His clarion call for revolt was calculated to demonstrate graphically to the world Czechoslovakia's right to be treated as an Allied nation.


NOTES
1.
Rudolf Schoenfeld, Chargé d'Affaires, U.S. Embassy, London, to Secretary of State, January 13, 1944, Foreign Relations 1944, v. 4, p. 804.
2.
Standley, Moscow, to Secretary of State, August 12, 1943, National Archives, Washington, D.C. 1218, reel 29.
3.
British Government meeting, London, September 24,1943, National Archives, 1218, Document 860F001/171, reel 29.
4.
Robert E. Sherwood, Roosevelt and Hopkins ( New York: Harpers, 1948), p. 804.

-215-

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Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxvi
  • 1- The Independence Movement Commences 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2- Founding of the Legions: Entrapment in Anti- Bolshevik Intervention 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3- The Legions Anabasis To the Sea 30
  • Notes 46
  • 4- Masaryk in America 50
  • Notes 62
  • 5- Drawing the Frontiers 63
  • Notes 70
  • 6- Internal Stabilization 72
  • Notes 84
  • 7- The Beneš Succession: Storm Warnings (1935-38) 85
  • Notes 101
  • 8- The Sudeten Fires Flare (1938) 103
  • Notes 121
  • 9- Summer Turmoil (1938) 124
  • Notes 130
  • 10- The Runciman Mission (summer 1938) 131
  • Notes 148
  • 11- Munich (september 1938) 151
  • Notes 169
  • 12- Aftermath of Munich (1938-41) 172
  • Notes 185
  • 13- War on Two Fronts (1941) 187
  • Notes 202
  • 14- Wartime Conferences And Treaties 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- The Slovak Uprising: The Government's Return Home 218
  • Notes 232
  • 16- The Government Reconstituted On Home Ground (1945) 235
  • Notes 245
  • 17- Nationalities Transfers And Allied Army Withdrawals (1945) 247
  • Notes 255
  • 18- Democratic Socialization (1945-46) 257
  • Notes 271
  • 19- Cold War Beginnings (1946) 273
  • Notes 287
  • 20- Storm Signals (1947) 290
  • Notes 306
  • 21- The Communist Coup (1947-48) 308
  • Notes 318
  • 22- The Death of Jan Masaryk (1948) 320
  • Notes 332
  • Abbreviations 333
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 343
  • About the Authors 353
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