Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War

By John O. Crane; Sylvia E. Crane | Go to book overview

At home, he was equally betrayed. His likely suicide was the ultimate protest against Gottwald and a regime so inhumane and contrary to everything that he, his father, and Beneš had stood for and worked for through all these years. He died spiritually, in the words Alice used with us so many times, when he saw his efforts so clearly failing. His chief raison d'être--to lead his people and to serve humanity--had been taken from him. He could no longer be loyal to his father's ideal of service. And he knew that a suicide in this context would not betray his father and the family name. So he chose to depart the scene at age 62 of his own volition, in his despairing but historically significant gesture of protest.


NOTES
1.
Letter from Charlotte Garrigue Masaryk to Thomas Masaryk, dated September 1, 1913, 18 pages, handwritten (copy), Crane family archive.
2.
Tomáš Masaryk, Suicide and the Meaning of Civilization ( Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1970), p. 7. Original publication in German, Vienna, 1881.
3.
Marcia Davenport, Too Strong for Fantasy ( New York: Scribner's, 1967).
4.
To the best of our knowledge, Marcia Davenport first learned of Jan's death from Ambassador Steinhardt, who had been very friendly with Jan. He had talked with Davenport when she called him from London and he informed her of Jan's death, nothing more. Robert Bruce Lockhart, Masaryk's closest English friend, later wrote a memoir of Jan in which he spoke of Davenport and himself as having had no evidence of murder and said that he attempted to dissuade Davenport from charging that Jan had been murdered, as she lacked solid facts.
5.
Ana and Herberta told the authors that they genuinely regretted having given one interview on this question to Claire Sterling, as they volunteered that they had no facts to go on. See Claire Sterling, The Masaryk Case ( New York: Harper and Row, 1968).
6.
Robert Bruce Lockhart, Jan Masaryk: A Personal Memoir ( New York: Philosophical Library, 1951), p. 67.
10.
Hana Beneš to authors. Sterling, The Masaryk Case.
11.
Related to authors by Loumir Soukup in 1977 in London.

-332-

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Czechoslovakia: Anvil of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xxvi
  • 1- The Independence Movement Commences 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2- Founding of the Legions: Entrapment in Anti- Bolshevik Intervention 11
  • Notes 26
  • 3- The Legions Anabasis To the Sea 30
  • Notes 46
  • 4- Masaryk in America 50
  • Notes 62
  • 5- Drawing the Frontiers 63
  • Notes 70
  • 6- Internal Stabilization 72
  • Notes 84
  • 7- The Beneš Succession: Storm Warnings (1935-38) 85
  • Notes 101
  • 8- The Sudeten Fires Flare (1938) 103
  • Notes 121
  • 9- Summer Turmoil (1938) 124
  • Notes 130
  • 10- The Runciman Mission (summer 1938) 131
  • Notes 148
  • 11- Munich (september 1938) 151
  • Notes 169
  • 12- Aftermath of Munich (1938-41) 172
  • Notes 185
  • 13- War on Two Fronts (1941) 187
  • Notes 202
  • 14- Wartime Conferences And Treaties 205
  • Notes 215
  • 15- The Slovak Uprising: The Government's Return Home 218
  • Notes 232
  • 16- The Government Reconstituted On Home Ground (1945) 235
  • Notes 245
  • 17- Nationalities Transfers And Allied Army Withdrawals (1945) 247
  • Notes 255
  • 18- Democratic Socialization (1945-46) 257
  • Notes 271
  • 19- Cold War Beginnings (1946) 273
  • Notes 287
  • 20- Storm Signals (1947) 290
  • Notes 306
  • 21- The Communist Coup (1947-48) 308
  • Notes 318
  • 22- The Death of Jan Masaryk (1948) 320
  • Notes 332
  • Abbreviations 333
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 343
  • About the Authors 353
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