Aging in Society: Selected Reviews of Recent Research

By Matilda White Riley; Beth B. Hess et al. | Go to book overview

Postword: Where We Are
and Where We Might Go

Beth B. Hess County College of Morris

We enter the 1980's in the wake of several decades of research and activism on behalf of America's elderly. Over the past 20 years, an extensive list of major legislation has been enacted: Medicare, the Older American's Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the indexing of Social Security, to name a few of the most prominent. The growth of mass membership in local organizations that focus on the concerns of senior citizens has been phenomenal. Closely linked to these societal-level developments, but following a dynamic process of its own, academic interest in aging and old age has also increased substantially during this period. This book is in many ways a tribute to the breadth and depth of inquiry into old age and aging now being carried out in hundreds of universities, colleges, centers, and institutes. We are today on the threshold of important accomplishments in the areas of research and theory building, as exemplified in this set of papers at the leading edge of this new scientific specialty.


SOME COMMON THEMES

A number of common themes emerge from these essentially independent papers. In most cases, the authors are as much concerned with demolishing erroneous stereotypes as with presenting new evidence. The overriding realization is that many outcomes commonly thought to be attributable to age are actually complex phenomena with multiple origins. The aging organism does not operate in a vacuum, but is engaged in a reciprocal interaction with a particular environment, and is itself the product of life-course experiences during a given slice of history. Physiological aging is only one of many factors that determine the condition and

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aging in Society: Selected Reviews of Recent Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.