The Life of the Mind: Selected Papers

By Jason W. Brown | Go to book overview

8 Frontal Lobes and the Organization of Action*

GENERAL REMARKS

The frontal lobes, it is often said, are the regions of the brain which have undergone the greatest expansion in evolution, represent the highest centers of human intelligence, and are the sites of the most complex and highly evolved mental functions. In human and animal studies, the frontal lobes have been associated with self-consciousness, moral behavior and foresight, the awareness of social norms, habituation, drive, abstract thinking and judgment. Frontal lobe mechanisms which have been proposed to underlie these capacities include synthetic or integrative functions, motivation, recent memory, selective attention, and planning.

In view of these claims, therefore, it is surprising that experimental and clinical studies have not yet succeeded in defining a set of symptoms or deficits clearly associated with damage to the frontal lobes, nor in isolating those aspects of behavior, apart from movement and speech, which depend on frontal lobe mechanisms. There are several reasons why this is so. Symptoms of frontal lobe damage are often subtle and appear only on careful testing. Neuropsychological studies tend to compare performance on a few tests in disparate populations, while case reports with anatomical correlation are often incomplete from the linguistic and psychological standpoint. The literature on prefrontal lobotomy has led to more confusion than insight, while problems in left frontal cases are often confounded by the presence of aphasia.

In spite of these difficulties, there is still much to be said regarding the functions of the frontal lobes. This article will review behavioral effects of frontal lobe damage in several different populations: cases of frontal lobotomy or lobectomy; mixed pathological groups; and single case studies. The frontal syndrome in monkey will also be discussed. The article will not deal with motor, oculomotor or autonomic

____________________
*
From "Frontal Lobes and the Microgenesis of Action" by J. W. Brown, 1985, Journal of Neurolinguistics, 1, 31-63. Copyright 1985 by Journal of Neurolinguistics. Adapted by permission.

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of the Mind: Selected Papers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction: Microgenetic Theory 1
  • I - Language 27
  • 1 - Language Representation in the Brain 29
  • Notes 99
  • 3 - Thalamic Mechanisms in Language 100
  • 4 - Selections on Aphasia and Lateralization 121
  • II - Perception 171
  • 5 - Microstructure of Objects 173
  • 6 - Microstructure of Images 206
  • 7 - Essay on Perception 252
  • III - Action 275
  • 8 - Frontal Lobes and the Organization of Action 277
  • 9 - The Microstructure of Action 302
  • 10 - The Problem of Perseveration 322
  • IV - 2 333
  • 11 - Toward a Microgenetic Theory of Memory 335
  • 12 - Emergence and Time 357
  • References 372
  • Author Index 419
  • Subject Index 431
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 437

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.