Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists

By Jontyle Theresa Robinson | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Stanlie M. James and Abena P. A. Busia, eds., Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women ( New York: Routledge, 1993), p. 240.
3.
Samella S. Lewis, The Art of Elizabeth Catlett (Claremont, CA: Hancraft Studios, 1984), p. 102.
6.
Faith Ringgold, We Flew Over the Bridge: The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1995), p. 159.
9.
See Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard, eds., The Power of Feminist Art: The American Movement of the 1970s, History and Impact ( New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1994), for a description of the organization, the names of the members, and a photograph, pp. 106-7. This text includes the most extensive coverge of black women in the feminist art movement. Ringgold's We Flew Over the Bridge also describes the activities of the organization.
10.
See Beverly Guy-Sheftall, ed., Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought ( New York: The New Press, 1995).
11.
Ringgold, We Flew Over the Bridge, p. 196.
12.
Jean Fagan Yellin, ed., Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1987), p. 77.
13.
Ringgold, We Flew Over the Bridge, p. 197.
16.
Eleanor Flomenhaft, ed., Faith Ringgold. A 25 Year Survey, exh. cat. (Hempstead, NY: Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, 1990), p. 23.
17.
Gumbo Ya Ya: Anthology of Contemporary African American Women Artists ( New York: Midmarch Arts), p. 226.
18.
See Thalia Gouma-Peterson's insightful analysis of Ringgold's story quilts in Flomenhaft, Faith Ringgold, pp. 23-32. See also Gouma- Peterson's "Faith Ringgold's Narrative Quilts", Arts Magazine, vol. 61, no. 5 ( January 1987): 66-68, for a more extensive discussion of The Purple Quilt.
19.
Cheryl A. Wall, ed., Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory, and Writing by Black Women ( New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1989), p. 1.
20.
Ringgold, We Flew Over the Bridge, pp. 11-12.
21.
Yolanda M. López and Moira Roth, "Social Protest: Racism and Sexism", in Broude and Carrard, The Power of Feminist Art, p. 140.
23.
See her stunning research on institutionalized racism within prestigious New York museums and galleries, which she presented at Hunter College in 1987 and later published as "Art (World) and Racism: Testimony, Documentation, and Statistics", Third Text, vol. 3, no. 4 ( Spring/ Summer 1988): 157-62.
24.
See bell hooks, "Straighten Up and Fly Right: Making History Visible", in Emma Amos: Paintings and Prints, 1982-92, exh. cat. (Wooster, OH: The College of Wooster Art Museum, 1993), pp. 15-28. The interview is reprinted in hooks Art on My Mind: Visual Politics ( New York: The New Press, 1995).
27.
Lowery Stokes Sims, "Aspects of Performance in the Work of Black American Women Artists", in Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology, eds. Arlene Raven, Cassandra L. Langer, and Joanne Frueh ( New York: HarperCollins, 1991), p. 219.
28.
Joyce Scott, En Masse/Fiber ( St. Louis: St. Louis Gallery of Contemporary Art, 1988), n.p.

AUTHOR'S NOTE

I have written here not as an art historian or art critic, but from my vantage point and training as a women's studies scholar who documents the intellectual, cultural, and political history of black women. I am also interested in the participation of black women in both black liberation movements and feminist movements and have analyzed our erasure in scholarly treatments of both struggles. By locating contemporary black women artists within the broader black feminist movement that began in the nineteenth century and continues to the present, this essay complements the point of view in my book Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought.

-47-

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Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Dedication 5
  • Acknowledgments 5
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Foreword 11
  • The Visual Education of Spelman Women 12
  • Notes 13
  • Passages - A Curatorial Viewpoint 15
  • Notes 36
  • Warrior Women: Art as Resistance 39
  • Notes 47
  • Triumphant Determination: the Legacy of African American Women Artists 49
  • Notes 78
  • African American Women Artists - Into the Twenty-First Century 83
  • Notes 93
  • Hagar's Daughters: Social History, Cultural Heritage, and Afro-U.S. Women's Art 95
  • Notes 108
  • Illustrations and Biographies 113
  • Afterword 161
  • Chronology 162
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • List of Illustrations 172
  • Index 174
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