Scene IV.

Rome. Cæsar's house. Enter Octavius Cæsar, reading a letter, Lepidus, and their train.

Cæs. You may see, Lepidus, and henceforth know,
It is not Cæsar's natural vice to hate
Our great competitor: from Alexandria
This is the news: he fishes, drinks and wastes
The lamps of night in revel: is not more manlike
Than Cleopatra, nor the queen of Ptolemy
More womanly than he: hardly gave audience, or
Vouchsafed to think he had partners: you shall find
there
A man who is the abstract of all faults
That all men follow.

Lep. I must not think there are 10

Evils enow to darken all his goodness:
His faults in him seem as the spots of heaven,
More fiery by night's blackness, hereditary
Rather than purchased, what he cannot change
Than what he chooses.

Cæs. You are too indulgent. Let us grant it is not
Amiss to tumble on the bed of Ptolemy,
To give a kingdom for a mirth, to sit
And keep the turn of tippling with a slave,

To reel the streets at noon and stand the buffet 20
With knaves that smell of sweat: say this becomes
him,--
As his composure must be rare indeed
Whom these things cannot blemish,--yet must Antony
No way excuse his soils, when we do bear

-35-

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Antony and Cleopatra
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface 1
  • Critical Comments 5
  • Dramatis Personae 20
  • Act First 21
  • Scene I 21
  • Scene II 23
  • Scene III 30
  • Scene IV 35
  • Scene V 38
  • Act Second 41
  • Scene I 41
  • Scene II 43
  • Scene III 53
  • Scene IV 54
  • Scene V 55
  • Scene VI 60
  • Scene VII 66
  • Act Third 71
  • Scene I 71
  • Scene II 73
  • Scene III 76
  • Scene IV 78
  • Scene V 80
  • Scene VI 81
  • Scene VII 84
  • Scene VIII 88
  • Scene IX 88
  • Scene X 89
  • Scene XI 90
  • Scene XII 93
  • Scene XIII 95
  • Act Fourth 103
  • Scene I 103
  • Scene II 104
  • Scene III 106
  • Scene IV 107
  • Scene V 109
  • Scene VI 110
  • Scene VII 112
  • Scene VIII 113
  • Scene IX 114
  • Scene X 116
  • Scene XI 116
  • Scene XII 117
  • Scene XIII 119
  • Scene XIV 119
  • Scene XV 125
  • Act Fifth 129
  • Scene I 129
  • Scene II 132
  • Glossary 149
  • Critical Notes 166
  • Explanatory Notes 172
  • Act First 172
  • Scene I 172
  • Scene II 173
  • Scene III 174
  • Scene IV 174
  • Scene V 175
  • Act Second 176
  • Scene I 176
  • Scene II 176
  • Scene III 178
  • Scene V 178
  • Questions On Antony and Cleopatra 192
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