Scene VI.

Rome. Cæsar's house. Enter Cæsar, Agrippa, and Mæcenas.

Cœs. Contemning Rome, he has done all this, and more,
In Alexandria: here's the manner of 't:
I' the market-place, on a tribunal silver'd
Cleopatra and himself in chairs of gold
Were publicly enthroned: at the feet sat
Cæsarion, whom they call my father's son,
And all the unlawful issue that their lust
Since then hath made between them. Unto her
He gave the stablishment of Egypt; made her

Of lower Syria, Cyprus, Lydia, 10
Absolute queen.

Mœc. This in the public eye?

Cœs. I' the common show-place, where they exercise.
His sons he there proclaim'd the kings of kings:
Great Media, Parthia, and Armenia,
He gave to Alexander; to Ptolemy he assign'd
Syria, Cilicia and Phœnicia: she
In the habiliments of the goddess Isis
That day appear'd, and oft before gave audience,
As 'tis reported, so.

Mœc. Let Rome be thus
Inform'd.

Agr.

Who, queasy with his insolence 20
Already, will their good thoughts call from him.

Cœs. The people know it, and have now received
His accusations.

Agr. Who does he accuse?

Cœs. Cæsar: and that, having in Sicily

-81-

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Antony and Cleopatra
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface 1
  • Critical Comments 5
  • Dramatis Personae 20
  • Act First 21
  • Scene I 21
  • Scene II 23
  • Scene III 30
  • Scene IV 35
  • Scene V 38
  • Act Second 41
  • Scene I 41
  • Scene II 43
  • Scene III 53
  • Scene IV 54
  • Scene V 55
  • Scene VI 60
  • Scene VII 66
  • Act Third 71
  • Scene I 71
  • Scene II 73
  • Scene III 76
  • Scene IV 78
  • Scene V 80
  • Scene VI 81
  • Scene VII 84
  • Scene VIII 88
  • Scene IX 88
  • Scene X 89
  • Scene XI 90
  • Scene XII 93
  • Scene XIII 95
  • Act Fourth 103
  • Scene I 103
  • Scene II 104
  • Scene III 106
  • Scene IV 107
  • Scene V 109
  • Scene VI 110
  • Scene VII 112
  • Scene VIII 113
  • Scene IX 114
  • Scene X 116
  • Scene XI 116
  • Scene XII 117
  • Scene XIII 119
  • Scene XIV 119
  • Scene XV 125
  • Act Fifth 129
  • Scene I 129
  • Scene II 132
  • Glossary 149
  • Critical Notes 166
  • Explanatory Notes 172
  • Act First 172
  • Scene I 172
  • Scene II 173
  • Scene III 174
  • Scene IV 174
  • Scene V 175
  • Act Second 176
  • Scene I 176
  • Scene II 176
  • Scene III 178
  • Scene V 178
  • Questions On Antony and Cleopatra 192
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