The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell - Vol. 3

By Sonia Orwell; Ian Angus et al. | Go to book overview

A Note on the Editing

The contents are arranged in order of publication except where the time lag between writing and appearance in print is unusually large, when we have chosen the date of writing. There are one or two rare exceptions to this rule generally made for the sake of illustrating the development in Orwell's thought, but a note at the end of each article or review states when, and in which publication, it appeared first. If it was not published or the date of writing has determined its position the date of writing is given. Where there is no mention of a periodical at the end of an article, it has never been published before. "Why I Write", written in 1946, has been placed at the beginning of Volume I, as it seems a suitable introduction to the whole collection. Where the article was reprinted in the major collections of his writing, this has been indicated and the following abbreviations used for the various books: CE, Collected Essays; CrE, Critical Essays; DD, Dickens, Dali and Others; EYE, England Your England; ITW, Inside the Whale; OR, The Orwell Reader; SE, Shooting an Elephant; SJ, Such, Such Were the Joys.

Any title in square brackets at the head of an article or review has been supplied by us. All the others are either Orwell's own or those of the editors of the publication in question. He certainly wrote his own titles for his Tribune pieces: some of the others read as if he had written them but with most it is hard to tell and there is no way of finally checking.

Only when the article has never been printed before have we had the manuscript to work from and none of these were revised by Orwell as they would have been had he published them. With every. thing else we have had to use the text as it appeared in print. As anyone who has ever done any journalism or book reviewing knows, this means the text which appears here may well be slightly, if not very, different from the text Orwell originally wrote. Editors cut,

-xiii-

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