Who Set You Flowin'? The African-American Migration Narrative

By Farah Jasmine Griffin | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
While the experience of migration is different and varied, the many portrayals of this moment have enough in common to constitute them as a new form of cultural production.
2.
Susan Willis, Specifying: Black Women Writing the American Experience ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1987). Willis argues that "no other body of writing . . . so intimately partakes of the transformation from rural to urban society or so cogently articulates the change in its content as well as its form" (p. 4); Hazel Carby, Reconstructing Womanhood: The Emergence of the Black Woman Novelist ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987); "'It jus Be's Dat Way Sometime': The Sexual Politics of Women's Blues," in Unequal Sisters: A Multicultural Reader in U.S. Women's History ed. Ellen Carol DuBois and Vicki L. Ruiz ( New York: Routledge, 1990), pp. 238-49 (first published in Radical America 20 [ 1986]: 9-24); "Policing the Black Woman's Body in an Urban Context," Critical Inquiry 18 ( Summer 1992): 738-55; Lawrence R. Rodgers, "Dorothy West's The Living Is Easy and the Ideal of Southern Folk Community," African American Review 26 ( Spring 1992): 167-68; "Paul Laurence Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods: The Doubly Conscious World of Plantation Fiction, Migration, and Ascent," American Literary Realism 24 ( Spring 1992): 42-57 ( Rodgers is also the author of a very important dissertation from which these two articles are drawn: "The Afro-American Great Migration Novel," Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1989); Charles Scruggs, Sweet Home: Invisible Cities in the Afro-American Novel ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993).
3.
Carby, "Policing the Black Woman's Body," p. 754.
4.
Trudier Harris has detailed the portrayal of lynchings in African-American fiction in Exorcising Blackness: Historical and Literary Lynching and Burning Rituals ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984).
5.
Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1977), pp. 8-16. While Foucault notes that "by the end of the 18th century and the beginning of the 19th century the gloomy festival of punishment was dying out, though here and there it flickered momentarily into life," in the American South these "festivals" occurred well into the twentieth century. Foucault continues, "Most changes [in punishment are] achieved by 1840 but the hold on the body did not entirely disappear in the mid-19th century." Beneath the qualifying phrases of these two statements lies the continuous history of the torture and punishment of black people in the New World. Foucault is talking about violence imposed by the state; the acts committed against black people in the American South were usually acts of vigilantism, although they were sanctioned by the state.
6.
Toni Morrison, "Rootedness: The Ancestor in Afro-American Fiction," in Black Women Writers at Work: A Critical Evaluation, ed. Mari Evans ( Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press, 1984), p. 343.

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who Set You Flowin'? The African-American Migration Narrative
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.