The Emergence of Modern Russia, 1801-1917

By Sergei Pushkarev; Robert H. McNeal et al. | Go to book overview

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FOR EASE OF REFERENCE, THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY is divided into twelve sections. Section 1 contains major bibliographic and historiographic works, with those in Russian listed separately for convenience; section 2, primary sources pertaining to the entire study period; and section 3, observations by foreign visitors to Russia. Sections 4 and 5 contain textbooks and general surveys for the entire period and for individual reigns, respectively. From then on the material is arranged by subject matter: internal political developments (section 6), social and economic conditions, with special emphasis on the history of the peasantry (sections 7 and 8), Russian cultural life (section 10), and foreign policy, with special emphasis on World War I and its consequences (sections 11 and 12). Section 9, social and political theory, is separated from the facts of social and political life only for the sake of convenience, since it is difficult to draw a clear dividing line between facts and ideologies in sociopolitical developments, and readers interested in them should consult both sections 6 and 9.

Several sections are further broken down into subsections, by subject matter. Within these divisions, a short list of primary sources comes first, followed by the secondary sources arranged alphabetically. The only exception occurs when several items directly relate to an author or an item in the list, in which case all such works are grouped together (for example, works on Lenin follow the entry Lenin). Some paperback (pb) editions are indicated for the reader's convenience.

The titles of primary sources are supplemented with short explanatory remarks, but space limitations make it impossible to dis

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