Poland, Bridge for the Abyss? An Interpretation of Developments in Post-War Poland

By Richard Hiscocks | Go to book overview

I. INTRODUCTION

PEACEFUL coexistence of two rival ideologies can take two forms. In one the ideologies exist side by side in the world without resort to physical violence. This may be described as static coexistence. In the other the rival ideologies and their protagonists may combine the advantages of respite from physical violence with progressive mutual understanding, perhaps also with a gradual approach to each other's points of view. This may be described as progressive coexistence.

At present, unfortunately, peaceful coexistence between the Western and Communist groups of States partakes very much more of the static than of the progressive form. There is widespread doubt, especially among politicians and officials, as to the feasibility or indeed the desirability of attempting a more dynamic approach.

Certain weaknesses are common to both Western and Communist peoples. There is the usual tendency to think oneself right and one's rival wrong: this is accentuated by widely differing religious, philosophical, and 'scientific' convictions. There is perhaps an even more dangerous tendency, due largely to ignorance and intellectual laziness, to oversimplify a highly complex issue. It is much less trouble to accept the assertions of the professional over-simplifiers, that is, propagandists and the popular press, and assume that our opponents are black and we are white than to undertake a strenuous exercise in self-criticism and the study of the other side's point of view, which may well lead, in some cases, to the conclusion that both are different shades of grey. Men do not usually hate, though they may disapprove, what they understand. But the process of understanding is often difficult and requires great mental effort. So too frequently they adopt the simpler course, accept the existence of a legitimate object of hatred or dislike, and thus set up an emotional barrier to mutual understanding.

To these common failings must be added certain attitudes of mind peculiar to each side. The chief weaknesses of the

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poland, Bridge for the Abyss? An Interpretation of Developments in Post-War Poland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 359

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.