International Law and Diplomacy in the Spanish Civil Strife

By Norman J. Padelford; Bureau of International Research of Harvard University and Radcliffe College. | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
CHAPTERPAGE
I. THE LEGAL STATUS OF THE CONTESTING PARTIES1
The Outbreak of the Insurrection1
The Admission of Insurgency by Foreign States3
Recognition of Belligerency in International Law7
Attempted Closures of Ports9
The Blockade of Bilbao12
The Non-Intervention System and Recognition of Belligerency14
Recognition of the Franco Government16
Belligerency Not Recognized by Foreign States18
Status of the Contesting Parties and their Property before Foreign Tribunals20
Conclusions23
II. INTERFERENCE WITH FOREIGN SHIPPING25
Visitation and Search by War Vessels26
The Use of Automatic Contact Mines28
Aerial Bombardment and Control31
The Four-Power Agreement of June 12, 193732
The Nyon Supplementary Agreement of September 17, 193733
Foreign Vessels within Territorial Waters35
Submarine Attacks39
The Nyon Arrangement of September 14, 193741
"Acts of Piracy"43
Conclusions50
III. THE INTERNATIONAL NON-INTERVENTION SYSTEM53
The 1873 Precedent54
Non-Intervention in Civil Strife56
Analysis of the Declarations of 193657
National Measures for the Enforcement of the Declarations60
The Non-Intervention Committee69
Rules of Procedure70
Agreement to Prohibit the Departure of Volunteers72
National Measures for the Restraint of Volunteers73
The Search for an International Control77
The March 8, 1937, Observation Scheme79
The Powers and Duties of:
The Non-Intervention Committee81
The International Board82
The Land Frontier Observers82

-xi-

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