The Western Frontiers of Imperial Rome

By Steven K. Drummond; Lynn H. Nelson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

We have directed this work not only to students of ancient history but also to those interested in frontier studies who may lack an extensive background in Roman history. For this reason, we have attempted to supply the reader with some amenities not usually provided in monographs in ancient history. We have tried to define all Latin expressions in the course of discussion and generally to use English equivalents if it is possible to do so without distorting the precise meaning of the terms involved. (We have provided a glossary at the back of the book, as well.) Where it is helpful to do so, we have provided the modern names, as well as the contemporary Latin names, of places.

There are several subjects, such as the army, the villa, and agriculture, that are particularly important to our discussion, and we have introduced each with a description of its general nature. The first chapter, for instance, begins with a portrayal of the organization and conditions of service of the Roman army in early imperial times; the third chapter, on farming, includes discussions of Roman agricultural technology and the organization of the villa system. The reader will appreciate that these characterizations are necessarily general and brief. The reader who is interested in greater detail and fuller treatments of the complexities of a subject will find that the bibliography offers both general introductions and specific studies in the areas discussed.

Although Roman history has a long tradition of intellectually rigorous scholarship, opinions still differ on many matters. Syntheses and generalizations frequently require extensive citations and justifications for the authors' accepting one point of view over another. It is also often necessary to acknowledge apparent exceptions to the general

-ix-

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The Western Frontiers of Imperial Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- The Edge of Empire 3
  • II- The Frontier Takes Shape 13
  • Notes 35
  • III- Feeding the Army- The Agrarian Settlement 42
  • Notes 70
  • IV- Pastoral Pursuits- Ranching and Grazing on the Frontier 77
  • Notes 96
  • V- Trading on and beyond the Frontier 101
  • Notes 122
  • VI- The Towns and Cities of the Frontier 127
  • Notes 147
  • VII- The Growth of Industry 152
  • Notes 169
  • VIII- The "Romanization" of the Frontier 172
  • Notes 191
  • IX- The Gods and Goddesses of the Frontier 196
  • Notes 212
  • X- Final Thoughts 216
  • Notes 224
  • Chronology of the Roman Frontier 225
  • Glossary 235
  • Selected Bibliography 249
  • Index 267
  • About the Authors 277
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