Effects of the Great War upon Agriculture in the United States and Great Britain

By Benjamin Hibbard H. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
The Results of the Food Administration

STATEMENT OF ITS OWN VIEWS

On January 23, 1918, the Food Administration sent out a statement of its own views as to results attained. The document follows:1

The accomplishments of the United States Food Administration since its inception some time after the beginning of the war last April have been slightly different from the popular conception of what they should have been, though on the whole they have been pretty much what the national and international American interest dictated they should be.

Summed up, the accomplishments have been these:

The Food Administration has handled the available American food sources and supplies with the supreme ultimate object of helping to win the war for America and the Allies by getting that food as abundantly produced, as carefully conserved, and as economically and equitably manufactured and distributed to strategic food points in the American and Allied world as possible. Its great task has been, is and will continue to be so to administer America's food resources that American and Allied morale will not be lowered through lack of food. All other considerations have been, are, and will continue to be predicated on this single object. It is the United States Food Administration's principal excuse for existence.

To effect this, the Food Administration has had to do the best it could with the legal and other equipment with which it was invested and which it possessed. To the provisions of the Food Act the Administration has added moral suasion and the powerful weapon of voluntary agreement based on personal interviews and discussions between its representatives and representatives of the businesses and communities affected, concerning specific food commodities and conditions.

With these utensils in hand, and the world food problem reduced to clear facts and figures which showed it what specific things it must do to accomplish its supreme object, the Food Administration instituted an extensive campaign to acquaint the American public with the situation and to point out to it what its share in solution of the problem must be.

Primarily, however, the great task begun with this equipment was to eliminate waste, hoarding, profiteering and speculation in the manufacture and

____________________
1
Food Administration, Bulletin No. 95.

-150-

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