Cognitive Responses in Persuasion

By Richard E. Petty; Thomas M. Ostrom et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

The idea for this volume began in informal discussions among the three editors at Ohio State University. We felt that the 1970s had brought a fundamental change to traditional work in social psychology on the problems of attitudes and persuasion. There seemed to be a shift in the problems being studied and the conceptual bases used to understand these new issues. Existing textbooks generally mirrored only the conceptual orientations that had been developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Yet contemporary research seemed less and less related to those traditional approaches.

We concluded that it would be useful at this point in the evolution of attitude research to try to identify the underlying commonalities that were emerging. Such an effort, although bound to be imperfect in some ways, should have several desirable effects. It should provide students with a textbook that does more than convey past history. It should bring coherence to their reading of contemporary attitude research as well as present them with the more enduring features of the earlier conceptual approaches. For active researchers, this volume should increase their awareness of converging lines of research and further encourage them to break away from the traditional research pathways.

Edited volumes on attitude change have historically played an important role through the education of students and guidance of subsequent research. Previously, the Hovland volumes (e.g., Hovland & Janis, 1959; Hovland, Luchins, Mandell, Campbell, Brock, McGuire, Feierabend, & Anderson, 1957) represented well the emergence of "attitude change" as an empirical science in the 1950s, and were instrumental in leading the field into the 1960s. In the late 1960s, the various volumes on consistency motives (e.g., Abelson, Aronson, McGuire, Newcomb, Rosenberg, & Tannenbaum, 1968; Feldman, 1966) repre

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognitive Responses in Persuasion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 476

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.