Feminist Approaches to Theory and Methodology: An Interdisciplinary Reader

By Sharlene Hesse-Biber; Christina Gilmartin et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Small Happinesses The Feminist Struggle to Integrate Social Research with Social Activism

ROBERTA SPALTER-ROTHAND HEIDI HARTMANN

The struggle to balance social science inquiry with social activism has been central in the lives of two generations of women. The first generation of researcher/activists was also the first group of women to be trained as social scientists in the new research universities of the late nineteenth-century United States. During this period, academic social science was in the process of becoming specialized and professionalized but was still oriented toward the illumination and solution of social problems (Fitzpatrick 1990). As part of the first wave of the feminist movement, these women were confident that the positivist method of social science inquiry and the voice of the social science expert could be employed in the service of progressive reform. A second generation of women, schooled in both the social sciences and the social movements of the 1960s and 1970s, became researcher/activists during the second wave of the feminist movement. Like the first generation, these women also use academic social science to raise public consciousness, advance public recognition of social problems, mobilize political support to change public agendas, and encourage structural reform. But unlike the first generation, who was committed to scientific objectivity as the basis of social reform, the second generation is more critical of the power relations embedded in the positivist method of the social sciences and is more ambivalent about its ability to bring about social reform.

In this chapter we first contrast the methodological views of these two generations of women. We then situate ourselves and our current research on work and welfare within what we have labeled "the dual vision of feminist policy research." This vision is an attempt to synthesize the views of the two generationsto create research that meets both the standards of positivist social science and feminist goals of doing research "for" rather than "on" women. Ideally, the research that results from this vision should provide reliable evidence while main

Roberta Spalter-Rothand Heidi Hartmann, Small Happinesses: The Feminist-Struggle to Integrate Social Research with Social Activism,in Heidi Gottfried, ed. Feminism and Social Change(Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1996): 206-24. Reprinted by permission.

-333-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminist Approaches to Theory and Methodology: An Interdisciplinary Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.