HOMILY 16

On the Fall of the first human beings. "They were both naked, Adam and his wife, without feeling shame."1.

I WOULD LIKE TODAY, dearly beloved, to open up for you spiritual treasure, which though distributed is never fully exhausted, (126a) which though bringing riches to everyone is in no way diminished but even increased. You see, just as in the case of material treasure people able to collect even a tiny nugget acquire for themselves great wealth, so too in the case of Sacred Scripture you can find in even a brief phrase great power of thought and wealth beyond telling. Such, after all, is the nature of this treasure: it enriches those receiving it without itself ever failing, rising as it does from the source which is the Holy Spirit. It remains for you, however, to keep careful guard on what is entrusted to you and preserve the memory of it untarnished so that you may with ease follow what is said, provided we make our contribution zealously. Grace, you see, is ready at hand and looks only for people welcoming it with generosity. (126b) Let us listen today also to what is read so that we may come to know of God's unspeakable love for humanity and the extent of the considerateness he employs with our salvation in mind.

(2) "They were both naked, Adam and his wife, without feeling shame." Consider, I ask you, the transcendence of their blessed condition, how they were superior to all bodily concerns, how they lived on earth as if they were in heaven, and though in fact possessing a body they did not feel the limitations of their bodies. After all, they had no need of shelter or habitation, clothing or anything of that kind. It was not idly

____________________
1.
Gn 2.25.

-207-

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Homilies on Genesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Select Bibliography vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Homily 1 Homily on the Beginning of the Holy Season of Lent 20
  • Homily 2 29
  • Homily 3 39
  • Homily 4 51
  • Homily 5 66
  • Homily 6 77
  • Homily 7 91
  • Homily 8 105
  • Homily 9 117
  • Homily 10 127
  • Homily 11 143
  • Homily 12 156
  • Homily 13 169
  • Homily 14 180
  • Homily 15 194
  • Homily 16 207
  • Homily 17 222
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