Banners to the Breeze: The Kentucky Campaign, Corinth, and Stones River

By Earl J. Hess | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

The Kentucky campaign, Corinth, and Stones River were events that participants would never forget, but modern-day historians have not been quite so devoted in their attention to them. Scholarly coverage has been uneven, at best, although more studies have been published in recent years, and still more new ones are likely to appear in the near future.

Bragg's invasion of Kentucky has remained obscure until very recently. James L. McDonough , War in Kentucky: From Shiloh to Perryville ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1994), is the only account of the campaign as a whole. McDonough illustrates the logistical problems Buell faced as he tried to capture Chattanooga early in the campaign, and he also provides much insight into the experience of ordinary soldiers. But his discussion of military engagements in the campaign is not detailed or analytical, and there are aspects of the campaign, such as Buell's advance from Louisville to Perryville, that are glossed over. The only other book of substance on the campaign is Kenneth A. Hafendorfer, Perryville: Battle for Kentucky ( Louisville KY: KH Press, 1991). It is a detailed tactical study of the battle with a short discussion of the campaign that led to it. No other author has given Perryville its due yas Hafendorfer has done, with extensive research, an abundance of good maps, and much attention paid to terrain.

The campaign in northern Mississippi by Price, leading to the battle of Iuka, and by Van Dorn, leading to the battle of Corinth, has also been ignored by historians until very recently. Only a handful of short articles had been written before Peter Cozzens , The Darkest Days of the War: The Battles of Iuka and Corinth (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), was published. Cozzens has written the only thoroughly researched, detailed, and soundly considered study of this fascinating campaign. Stones River has gotten the lion's share of attention among historians, compared to the other two campaigns, with two major studies in print. James L. McDonough, Stones River: Bloody Winter in Tennessee ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1980), is the first book on the battle that was not written by a contemporary of the

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Banners to the Breeze: The Kentucky Campaign, Corinth, and Stones River
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.