England without and Within

By Richard Grant White; Hamlet | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.
LIVING IN LONDON.

MY search for lodgings in London ended in my fixing myself in Maddox Street, which runs from Regent Street near its upper end across New Bond Street. Here I had a parlor, bedroom, and dressingroom on the second floor; and, although they were not handsome, perhaps hardly cheerful, I was very comfortable. I did not mind it that my little sideboard, my sofa, and my chairs were old mahogany of the hideous fashion of George IV.'s day. They were respectable, and there was a keeping between them and the street into which I looked through chintz window-curtains that reminded me not unpleasantly of those that had hung over my mother's bed in my boyhood. They were much more grateful to my eye than those which formed the canopy of my bed, which were heavy moreen of such undisturbed antiquity that they made the room somewhat stuffy. But I liked the old bedstead, which was a four-poster so high that I ascended to it by steps; and those also brought back my boyhood to me in the recollection of a dreadful fall which I had from just such a pair, which I had mounted to blow a feather into the air, in defiance of parental injunction. The low French bedstead long ago drove the four-poster out of "American" bedrooms, in the Northern cities at least; but in England the stately and, to uneasy sleepers, some-

-90-

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England without and Within
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Advertisement v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - Introductory 1
  • Chapter II - English Skies 13
  • Chapter III - England on the Rails 37
  • Chapter IV - London Streets 62
  • Chapter V - Living in London 90
  • Chapter VI - A Sunday on the Thames 118
  • Chapter VII - A Day at Windsor 142
  • Chapter VIII - Rural England 164
  • Chapter IX - English Men 191
  • Chapter X - English Women 210
  • Chapter XI - English Manners 236
  • Chapter XII - Some Habits of English Life 265
  • Chapter XIII 290
  • Chapter Xiv. Taurus Centaurus. 319
  • Chapter Xv. Parks and Palaces. 341
  • Chapter Xvi. English in England. 364
  • Chapter Xvii. A Canterbury Pilgrimage. 393
  • Chapter Xviii. John Bull. 421
  • Chapter Xix. Oxford and Cambridge. 438
  • Chapter Xx. A National Vice. 464
  • Chapter Xxi. The Heart of England. 489
  • Chapter Xxii. A Visit to Stratford-On-Avon. 509
  • Chapter Xxiii. In London Again. 531
  • Chapter Xxiv. Random Recollections. 555
  • Chapter Xxv. Philistia. 577
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