Health Care's Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars

By Jacqueline Goodman-Draper | Go to book overview

these nurses support is professional unionism. Although they are no longer eligible for membership in the collective bargaining unit, they support the professional association's individualist strategy of credentialism, as well as minimal economic struggle within the workplace (compromising with hospital management as much as possible). Thus, professional unionism represents the individualist goals of middle managers and recognizes their lack thereof.

Finally, 80 percent of the nurses in the high class position interpret professionalism as synonymous with capitalist individualism. Social and economic status can be attained only by those individuals who choose a twofold approach: (1) improving their own human capital through credentialism and compliant behaviors, in concert with the goals of management, and (2) gaining monopoly control over the education and market of the occupation. They view the nature of conflict as that between different occupations, which is fought outside the workplace, in state and federal arenas. Thus, they focus on securing greater occupational turf, power, and profits by pressuring state and federal legislatures.

The collective strategy that reflects this interpretation of professionalism is professionalization: monopoly control over the occupation's expertise, producers of that expertise, and market for that expertise. All nurses in the high class location supported this strategy. Through such an "objective," gatekeeper's strategy, nurses in the high class position conceal and legitimate inequality in their occupation, social and economic superiority for the nursing elite, revealing their own class identification with the powers that be.


NOTES
1.
As I discussed in Chapter 1, nurses at each research site had actively worked to decertify their bargaining representatives. St. John's nurses successfully decertified the League of Registered Nurses, Local 1199 in 1984 in favor of NYSNA, and Mt. Zion nurses unsuccessfully attempted to decertify NYSNA in 1982 in favor of Local 1199 of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, League of Registered Nurses or the Federation of Nurses/AFT. NYSNA won 53 percent of the vote at Mt. Zion, with the trade unions winning 43 percent of the vote. Four percent of the votes were challenged. At St. John's Hospital, NYSNA won.
2.
This information was disseminated by management in a memo, which took a stab against the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) by associating it with the toughguy image of trade unionism. The union appears to have been deliberately mislabeled, "The United Federation of Teachers, AFL/CIO." The correct title is Federation of Nurses/AFT.
3.
Attributing this rather high salary to the blue collar labor force makes sense when considering that she works on a daily basis with physicians and administrators who earn well over three times this amount.
4.
Incorporating the dissemination of human capital ideology into the job description of nurses in a medium class location is in concert with E. O. Wright's analysis of class alliances. He argues that dominant classes pursue class alliances with

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Care's Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments iv
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Notes 25
  • Chapter 2 Rise of the White Collar Worker, Ideology of Professionalism, and White Collar Strategies: The Case of Nursing 29
  • Notes 48
  • Chapter 3 Nurses' Class Position 51
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter 4 Visions of Professionalism: A Window on Class Identity 87
  • Notes 129
  • Chapter 5 Conclusion (or Where Does the Frayed Collar Go From Here?) 133
  • Note 139
  • Appendix A Professional Nurse Survey 141
  • Appendix B Survey Coding 147
  • Appendix C New York State Nurses Association: Questions and Answers About Entry into Practice 155
  • References 159
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 174
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.