Helms and Hunt: The North Carolina Senate Race, 1984

By William D. Snider | Go to book overview

on soft drinks, cigarettes, and gasoline. But neither got very far in later campaigns.

"I think [ Hunt's] been strengthened," said John A. Williams, the governor's budget officer. "He's advocated a program against tremendous odds and he's won. And people love a winner. He's a stronger man today than he was three months ago." "It won't help him," said Bert Bennett. "But it's a lot better that he won approval of the tax than lost it. That would have been worse. I don't think the gas tax will be as serious for Hunt as the food tax was for Sanford."

Helms's chief lieutenant Ellis said, "I don't see how it's a plus [for Hunt]." Some Hunt partisans, though, believed the Congressional Club opposition had helped consolidate Democratic support for the governor. "The appeal was that we need to prove to these people right now that we're going to stick together;" said one legislator.

Hunt himself said he considered it the toughest fight of his life, even tougher than the second-term campaign, and he probably saw the battle in the clearest perspective. "I'm going to have eight years in office," he said. "By the time I'm through, and there are many more things to do, I will be judged on all of them." Bob Scott echoed that theme and added, "One thing in Hunt's favor is that we live in a time of high interest rates with everything going up, and three cents a gallon may get lost in the shuffle."

Hunt's supporters were betting that would happen. Even as the campaign faded, some decided to respond to the Congressional Club's ad charging the Hunt administration with "cronyism." They printed up a batch of T-shirts bearing the words: "I'm one of Jim Hunt's cronies." They also obtained T-shirts for the governor and Mrs. Hunt with the words "No. 1 Crony" and "No. 1 Crony's Wife."


114. Helms at Bay

In September 1981 Hugh Morton, a public-spirited entrepreneur, asked Jesse Helms and Jim Hunt to help save the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. The 110-year-old landmark on North Carolina's Outer Banks had been

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Helms and Hunt: The North Carolina Senate Race, 1984
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Prologue 3
  • Mr. Clean and the Fire Chief's Son 5
  • I. Patriarch and Upstart 7
  • 2. Salt of the Earth People 10
  • 2. Salt of the Earth People 18
  • 2. Salt of the Earth People 25
  • 5. Too Proud to Be Proud 31
  • Naysayer and Pragmatist 37
  • 6. the Lone Ranger 39
  • 7. a Touch of Camelot and Carter 43
  • 7. a Touch of Camelot and Carter 49
  • 10. a New Direction 58
  • Master Campaigner and Avenging Angel 63
  • Ii. Political Tarnish 65
  • 12. Catching Hand Grenades 70
  • 13. Against the Wind 78
  • 114. Helms at Bay 82
  • 114. Helms at Bay 91
  • 114. Helms at Bay 95
  • 17. That Old-Time Religion 104
  • Epochal Battle or Mud Fight? 111
  • 18. "I'Ll Carry It" 113
  • 19. "Helms Can't Win" 117
  • 20. the D'Aubuisson Connection 122
  • 21. the School of Hard Knox 128
  • 22. the Windsor Story 136
  • 23. When Helms Wasn't Helms 139
  • 24. Time Out for Party Time 146
  • 25. the Big Guns of August 150
  • The Helmsmen Ride High 157
  • 26. a Severe Identity Crisis 159
  • 27. the Reagan Tide 167
  • 28. "Macabre Wild Card" 179
  • 30. Search and Destroy 186
  • 31. a Dead Heat? 194
  • 31. a Dead Heat? 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.