Menace in the West: The Rise of French Anti-Americanism in Modern Times

By David Strauss | Go to book overview

This assertion of the formative influence of American life, which surfaced briefly in the 1890s, was widely accepted among French intellectuals in the 1920s.

The organization of this study has been largely determined by a desire to clarify the interaction between the concerns of the French observer and the dynamic aspects of American life. Part I describes two different conceptions of American life which held sway among French observers in the prewar and wartime eras. These approaches, combined with the ideological orientation of the observers discussed in Part II, chapter 4, comprise the initial perspective against which French observers judged the events of the twenties. Their reactions to the broad pattern of events set in motion by the war, including the decline of Europe and the rise of American civilization, are presented in the last two chapters of Part II. Parts III and IV detail the attitudes of the intellectuals to the major new developments in American foreign policy and American society during the twenties. These reactions forced Frenchmen to reformulate their image both of the United States and of Franco-American relations as shown in Part V. The final section demonstrates that the new conceptions of the twenties proved to be surprisingly durable despite the upheaval of the Great Depression and World War II.


NOTES
1.
Democracy in America, ed. by Phillips Bradley ( New York, 1955), II, 183.
2.
American Studies in Europe ( Philadelphia, 1958), I, 33.
3.
Situations III ( Paris, 1949), 122. The French fascination with America in the 1920s may be confirmed in a comparative way as well. Theodore Zeldin has suggested that leading French authors lost interest in England at this time and turned increasingly to a consideration of America, Russia, or Germany. France, 1848-1945: Vol, 2. Intellect, Taste and Anxiety ( Oxford, 1977), 111-113. The decisive impact of her crowd's encounter with American culture in the late twenties is described by Simone de Beauvoir in her autobiography. She recalls evenings spent with Sartre, Paul Nizan, and André Herbaud during which Sartre would sing American popular songs such as "Old Man River" and listen to recordings of Negro spirituals. Mémoires d'une jeune fille rangée ( Paris, 1958), 335. The same crowd was partial to American cocktails (martinis, side-cars, and bronxes) and American films. Simone de Beauvoir recalls that Sartre wept while listening to

-10-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Menace in the West: The Rise of French Anti-Americanism in Modern Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.