Altered States: The United States and Japan since the Occupation

By Michael Schaller | Go to book overview

2
KOREAN WAR AND THE PEACE WITH JAPAN, 1950-52

WASHINGTON interpreted the North Korean attack of June 25, 1950, on the Republic of Korea as ultimately directed against Japan. As Dulles commented during the first months of fighting, the "communist offensive in Korea was probably aimed at getting control over Japan, for had Korea been conquered Japan would have fallen without an open struggle." The Korean attack made it "more important, rather than less important" to conclude a treaty. The "very fact" that Communist aggression in Korea sought to "check positive and constructive action" in Japan proved the "importance to take such action." Finally, Dulles warned, if progress toward a peace treaty stalled "because of total preoccupation with the Korean war . . . we may lose in Japan more than we can gain in Korea." 1

When President Truman sent the Seventh Fleet to protect Taiwan, boosted aid to Indochina, and committed American troops to the Korean peninsula, Japan received a critical economic stimulus and emerged as the locus of the American defense strategy in Asia. State and Defense officials recognized that the Korean War would result in American forces playing an expanded role in and around Japan. MacArthur's June 23 proposal for "unrestricted" base rights became the reference point for security plans. The trick, as Dulles saw it, was to get the military establishment to endorse "in a form as inoffensive as possible to the Japanese," an arrangement giving the United States "broad power . . . to place military forces wherever in Japan the United States may determine to be desirable."

Dulles assured Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson that the United States should have "the right to maintain in Japan as much force as we wanted, anywhere we wanted for as long as we wanted." This, Johnson

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Altered States: The United States and Japan since the Occupation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.